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Full text of "Missouri Driver Guide August 2013"

Department of Revenue 



tAiyi^' wKo Kan/^ ^-uve^ tAe^ txAre^ 

A- 



Dear Fellow Missourians: 

experienced drivers, 
state's raotot vehicle laws. 

Sb^w-MoSt^cmakesafcdnvingxhcirNo. I goal, 



Table of Contents 



Chapter 1 — The Missouri Driver License and the Graduated 



Driver License Law Page 8 

• Types of Permits 8 

• Types of Licenses 9 

• Requirements to Obtain Your License or Permit 1 0 

• Required Documents 1 1 

• Social Security Number 12 

• Fees for Permits/Licenses 13 

• Restrictions 14 

• Endorsements 14 

• Renewing a License or Permit 15 

• Otiier Information About Your Driver License 16 

• Suspension/Revocation of Your License 19 

• The Graduated Driver License (GDL) Law 20 

• Step One: Instruction Permit 21 

• Step Two: Intermediate License 21 

• Step Tinree: Full (Under 21) License 22 

• A Checklist for You 23 

Chapter 2 — The Driver Examination Page 24 

• The Driver Examination 24 

• Where to Take the Exam 24 

• Verification of Name and Age 24 

• Written Test 24 

• Vision Test 24 

• Road Sign Test 25 

• Driving Test 25 

• Your Grade 27 

• Failing the Driving Test 27 

• Fraud 27 

Chapter 3 — Pavement Markings, Traffic Signs, 

Lights, and Signals Page 28 

• Pavement Markings on the Road 28 

• Meanings of Pavement Markings 28 

• Direction of Traffic 28 

• No Passing Zones 28 

• Left-Turn Lanes 29 

• Crosswalks and Stop Lines 29 

• Dual Use Lanes 29 

• Reversible Express Lanes 30 

• Shared Center Lanes 30 



1 



• No Lane Markings 30 

• Traffic Officers 30 

• Traffic Signals 30 

• Flashing Light Signal 31 

• Traffic Control Signals 31 

• Lane Use Control Signals 32 

• Traffic Signs 32 

• Sign Shapes 33 

• Warning Signs 33 

• Regulatory Signs 37 

• Stop Sign 38 

• Yield Sign 39 

• Wrong Way Sign 39 

• Do Not Enter Sign 39 

• Lane Control Signs 39 

• Speed Limit Signs 39 

• Railroad Crossing Sign 40 

• Work Zone Signs 41 

• Guide Signs 42 

• Service Signs 42 

• Route Signs 42 

• Emergency Reference Markers 42 

• Roundabout Signs 42 

Chapter 4 — Rules of the Road Page 43 

• Right-Of-Way 43 

• Passing 43 

• Intersections 44 

• Emergency Vehicles 44 

• School Buses 44 

• Hand and Vehicle Signals 45 

•Turns 45 

• U-Turns 46 

• Right Turns 46 

• Left Turns 46 

• One-Way Street Onto a Two-Way Street 46 

• Two-Way Street Onto a One-Way Street 46 

• Two-Way Street Onto a Two-Way Street 47 

• Multiple Left Turn Lanes 47 

• Two-Way Left Turn Lanes 47 

• Roundabout Intersections 48 

• City/County Ordinances 48 

Chapter 5 — Parking Page 49 

• No-Parking Zones 49 



2 



• When Can You Park in Handicapped Parking Spaces? 49 

• International Symbol of Access 50 

• Parking on Hills 50 

• Parallel Parking 51 

Chapter 6 — Highway Driving Page 52 

• Drive in the Proper Lane 52 

• Controlling Speed 52 

• Passing on Highways 52 

• Being Passed 53 

• Adjusting to Traffic 53 

• Be Aware of the Traffic Around You 53 

• Slow Moving Traffic 53 

• Stopping 54 

• Controlled Access Highways 54 

• Entering the Highway 54 

• Leaving the Highway 55 

• Interchanges 55 

• Watch out for "Highway Hypnosis" 55 

• Stop Driving When You Feel Sleepy 56 

• Emergencies 56 

Chapter 7 — Sharing The Road Page 57 

• Sharing the Road with Motorcycles 57 

• Sharing the Road with Trucks 58 

• Sharing the Road with Pedestrians 59 

• Sharing the Road with Mopeds and Bicycles 60 

• Funeral Processions 63 

• Road Rage 63 

• Drunk Drivers 64 

• About Littering 64 

Chapter 8 — Safe Driving Tips For Everyday Driving Page 65 

• Use Seat Belts and Child Restraints 65 

• Seat Belts — It's the Law 65 

• Child Passenger Restraint Law 65 

• Age/Weight/Height Classifications 65 

• Defensive Driving 66 

• Proper Posture While Driving 66 

• Steering 66 

• Following Other Vehicles 67 

• Three Second Rule 67 

• Space Behind 67 

• Space to the Side 67 

• Stopping Distance 68 



3 



• Average Stopping Distance of Cars on Dry Level Pavement 68 

• Letting Otiiers Know What You are Doing 69 

• Signal When You Change Direction 69 

• Using Your Horn 69 

• Slow Pol<e Driving 69 

• Carbon Monoxide 69 

Chapter 9 — Safe Driving Tips For Special 

Driving Conditions Page 71 

• Night Driving 71 

• Winter Driving 71 

• Wet Pavement 72 

• Anti-Locl< Bral<es (ABS) 73 

• Skidding 73 

•Fog 73 

• Handling Vehicle Emergencies 73 

Chapter 10 — Be in Shape to Drive Page 76 

• Alcohol, Drugs, and Driving 

• Administrative Actions 76 

• Court Convicted Actions 77 

• Missouri's Abuse and Lose Law 79 

• Minor in Possession (MIP) and Other Alcohol Offenses 79 

• Proof of Insurance 79 

• Refusal to Submit to a Chemical Test 80 

• Ignition Interlock and Reinstatement Requirements 80 

Chapter 11 — The Point System and How It Affects You Page 81 

• Racking Up Points: The Consequences 81 

• How Points Come Off Your Driving Record 82 

• Other Consequences 82 

• Driving While Suspended or Revoked 82 

• Failure to Appear in Court (FACT) 82 

Chapter 12 — Vehicle Titling and Registration Page 84 

• Titling Your Vehicle 84 

• What You Need to Get a Title 84 

• Vehicles Bought in Missouri 84 

• Vehicles Bought Out-of-State (not in Missouri) 84 

• Properly Assigned Titles 85 

• Salvage Vehicles 85 

• Odometer Readings 85 

• Registering Your Vehicle 85 

• What You Need to Register Your Vehicle 86 

• Other Information 87 

• Selling a Vehicle 87 

• Stolen License Plates and Tabs 87 

• Lost or Destroyed Title, Plates, or Tabs 87 



4 



• Missouri License Plate Information 87 

• Personalized Plates 87 

Chapter 13 — Mandatory Insurance Page 88 

• The Basics 88 

• Minimum Coverage Requirements 88 

• Maintaining Your Insurance 88 

• Failure to Keep Insurance 89 

• Failure to Pay for Damages 89 

• Accidents and Crashes 90 

• Filing an Accident Report 90 

Chapter 14 — Safety and Emissions Inspections 

and Required Equipment Page 92 

• Safety Inspections 92 

• Exceptions to the Requirement 92 

• Equipment Needed 93 

• Other Equipment Required by Law 94 

• Emissions Inspections 95 

• Exceptions to the Requirement 95 

Chapter 15 — Commercial Vehicles Page 96 

• Size Limitations (Without Special Permit) 96 

• Height 96 

• Width 96 

• Length 96 

• Exemptions From Size Limits 97 

• Weight Limitations (Without Special Permit) 97 

• Maximum Weight on Any Single Axle Pounds 97 

• Maximum Weight on Any Tandem Axle Pounds 97 

• Maximum Gross Weight Pounds 98 

• Overdimension and Overweight Permits 98 

• Vehicle Route Map 98 

• Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations 98 

• Transporting Hazardous Material 99 

• Emergency Equipment and Signals 99 

• Information on Commercial Motor Vehicles 99 

• Following Distance 99 

• Railroad Crossing 100 

• Load Security 100 

• Off-Tracking 100 

• Weigh Stations 100 

• Tailgaters 100 

• Space Overhead 100 



5 



• Soft Surfaces 

• Space to Cross or Enter Traffic. 



101 
101 



Sample Test Questions 



Page 102 



Index 



Page 109 



Glossary 



Page 112 



Contact Information 



Page 115 



NOTE: The state motor vehicle laws described in this manual are not 
reproduced in their entirety and the wording is not identical. Due to 
possible federal and state law changes and Department of Revenue 
(department) policy, the information in this manual may not always be 
current. The department will make every effort to incorporate any changes 
as soon as possible. 



The Missouri Driver Guide is published by 
the Missouri Department of Revenue. 



6 



Carefully studying the Missouri Driver Guide will increase your driving 
confidence and broaden your knowledge of Missouri traffic laws. The 
more knowledge you have, the safer you are! 

To test your knowledge of traffic laws, you will need to take a written test 
of 25 multiple-choice questions. Studying this guide will prepare you for 
that test. You must correctly answer 20 questions to pass the test. All of 
the test questions come directly from information found in this guide. There 
are no "trick" questions. 

To test your ability to drive a vehicle, you must take a driving skills 
test. Your examiner realizes a driving test will probably be an unusual 
experience for you, and you might even become nervous or uneasy. If 
you do become nervous or fearful, please remember your examiner has 
accompanied many other people exactly like you, and the examiner rides 
with you only to make sure you can control your vehicle and observe 
the rules of safety. Your examiner will not try to trick you in any way. 
Remember that thousands of people pass this test every year and become 
licensed drivers. If they can do it, so can you! Just relax and do the best 
you can. 



We would like to hear your comments and questions about the 
material included in this manual: 



Address: 



Telephone: 
Fax: 



E-Mail: 
Web Site: 



Driver License Bureau 
P.O. Box 200 

Jefferson City, IVIO 65105-0200 
(573) 751-2730 
(573) 522-8174 
dlbmail@dor.mo.gov 
www.dor.mo.gov 



The names and telephone numbers of other related agencies 
and offices are located inside the back cover of this guide. 



If you need a Missouri Commercial Driver License IVIanual or Motorcycle 
Operator Manual, you may request one from the Missouri State Highway 
Patrol, or any Motor Vehicle and Driver Licensing Contract Office (contract 
office). The Missouri Commercial Driver License Manual and the 
Motorcycle Operator Manual are also posted on our web site: 
www.dor.mo.gov. 



7 



CHAPTER 1 — THE MISSOURI DRIVER LICENSE 



Anyone who operates a motor vehicle or motor-driven cycle on public 
roadways in Missouri is required to have a valid driver license. You may 
obtain a Missouri driver license at any one of Missouri's 183 license offices. 

You must have a Missouri driver license if: 

• You live in Missouri, are 16 years of age or older, and plan to drive. 

• You are a new resident of Missouri and want to drive, even if you have a 
driver license from another state. 

• You are an out-of-state commercial driver who has moved to Missouri 
within the last 30 days. (Please refer to the Missouri Commercial Driver 
License l\/lanuai.) 

Certain persons are not required to obtain a Missouri driver license. You do 
not need a Missouri driver license if: 

• You are a member of the armed forces and you have a valid driver 
license from your home state. 

• You are a full-time student and you have a valid driver license from your 
home state. 

• You operate or temporarily operate/move any farm tractor or implement 
on a highway for agri-related purposes. 

You are required to carry your driver license or permit when you drive. If 
any law enforcement officer asks to see your driver license or permit, you 
must present it. It is against the law for you to allow anyone else to use 
your license or permit. 

TIP! Anyone obtaining a new license or permit or renewing a license or 
permit is required to show verification of name, date of birth, place of birth, 
social security number, and Missouri residential address. These require- 
ments are explained in detail later in this chapter. 

TYPES OF PERMITS 

If you are under 21 years of age, you will be issued a permit identifying you 
as a minor. 

Instruction Permit — Eligible Age: 15 

This is the first step in Missouri's Graduated Driver License Program for 
young drivers. Generally, this permit allows a young person to learn to drive 
with the supervision of a licensed adult. See later in this chapter for detailed 
information. 

Motorcycle Instruction Permit — Eligible Age: ^5V2 or 16 

You may apply for a motorcycle instruction permit to learn to operate a 
motorcycle or motortricycle. The age you are eligible to apply may be 151/2 
or 16 years, as described below. 

• 1514 years of age (15 years and 182 days) 
The Motorcycle Instruction Permit will only be issued if you have 
successfully completed an approved motorcycle rider training course. 



8 



You must pass the Class F and Class M written, vision, and road sign 
tests. You must also have the written consent of your parent or legal 
guardian. This permit allows daylight driving only, within a 50-mile radius 
of home, a motorcycle of no larger than 250 cc, and no passengers. 

• 16 years of age or older 

If you are 1 6 years old or older you may apply for a motorcycle 
instruction permit, but the motorcycle rider training course is not required. 
If you do not have a valid driver license, you must take the Class F and 
Class M written tests to receive a motorcycle instruction permit. 

When you are ready, you may take the motorcycle driving test and pay the 
appropriate fee to become motorcycle qualified. 

For more information on IVIissouri's laws on motorcycles, please obtain a 
copy of the Motorcycle Operator Manual at the Missouri Highway Patrol 
testing station or at one of our license offices. 

TYPES OF LICENSES 

If you are under 21 years of age, you will be issued a license identifying you 
as a minor. When you reach age 21 , you may apply and pay for another 
driver license (without the minor indication) or wait until your under-21 
license expires. 

Intermediate License (Class F) — Eligible Age: 16 

This is the second step in Missouri's Graduated Driver License program 
for young drivers. Generally, this license allows a young person certain 
restricted driving privileges. See later in this chapter for detailed information. 

Full Driver License (Class F) — Eligible Age: 18 

This is the basic driver license, also called an operator license. You must 
have a Class F license to operate any motor vehicle (other than one requiring 
you to have a Class A, B, C, or E license.) The Class F license does not 
allow you to drive a motorcycle unless the license shows the Motorcycle (M) 
endorsement. Endorsements will be discussed later in this chapter. You 
must pass the Class F written, vision, road sign, and driving tests. 

For-Hire License (Class E) — Eligible Age: 18 

When you test for a Class E license, the written exam will include questions 
based on the complete driver guide, but mainly Chapter 15 (Commercial 
Driver Licenses). You must also pass the vision and road sign tests. If you 
already have a Class F license, a driving test is not required. However, you 
must still meet the "under 21 requirements" (see page 21) for a full license if 
you apply for a Class E license at age 18. There are a number of reasons 
you may wish to obtain a Class E license, such as: 

• If you receive pay for driving a motor vehicle transporting 14 or fewer 
passengers (such as a driver for a day care center). 

• If you will transport property for pay or as part of your job (such as a 
pizza or florist delivery driver). 



g 



• If you regularly operate a motor vehicle for your employment which 
belongs to another person and is designed to carry freight and 
merchandise. The vehicle must be 26,000 pounds or less gross 
vehicle weight rating (GVWR) and not required to be placarded for 
hazardous materials. 

Motorcycle License (Class M) — Eligible Age: 16 

You must have a Class M license or permit (or a driver license with the M 
endorsement) if you operate a motorcycle or motortricycle on public 
roadways. You will need to pass the Class F and Class M written, vision, 
road sign, and motorcycle skills tests. Graduated driver license requirements 
will apply to Class M license applicants between the ages of 16 and 18. 
See the Graduated Driver License requirements later in this chapter. 

For more information about Missouri's motorcycle laws, please obtain a copy 
of the Motorcycle Operator Manual at the Missouri Highway Patrol testing 
station or at one of our license offices. 

Commercial Driver License (Class A, B, or C) 

You must have a commercial driver license based on the type of commercial 
motor vehicle you drive. You must be at least 18 years old to apply for a 
CDL, and at least 21 years old to obtain a CDL with a Hazardous 
Materials or School Bus endorsement. You must still meet the "under 21" 
requirements if you apply for a CDL at age 18. Please refer to the Missouri 
Commercial Driver License (CDL) ManuaMor detailed information about the 
CDL program. 

Nondriver License/Identification Card (Class ND) 

You may obtain a photo nondriver license for identification purposes. Your 
nondriver license expires on your date of birth in the sixth year after you 
apply. If you are age 70 or older, your nondriver license will never expire. 

REQUIREMENTS TO OBTAIN A LICENSE OR PERMIT 

Depending on your age, whether you are obtaining a new license or permit, 
if you are renewing one, or if you have just moved to Missouri, the 
requirements to obtain a license are slightly different. 

• If you are a driver age 1 5 to 21 , the Graduated Driver License (GDL) 
program applies to you. Please see the GDL section in this chapter for 
more information. You will need to show verification of name, date of 
birth, place of birth, social security number, and Missouri residential 
address (detailed in this chapter) to qualify. 

• If you are a Missouri driver renewing a license, you must show verification 
of name, date of birth, place of birth, social security number and Missouri 
residential address. You will also surrender your previous license and 
take the vision and road sign tests. 

• If you are obtaining a new Missouri license, you must show verification 
of name, date of birth, place of birth, social security number and Missouri 
residential address . You will be required to take the four-part driver 
examination. The four-part exam consists of a written test, vision test, road 
sign test, and a driving skills test. (See Chapter 2 for more information.) 



10 



• If you are new to Missouri and are transferring your out-of-state driver 
license, you will need to present verification of name, date of birth, place 
of birtli, social security number, Missouri residential address, and mailing 
address, if different than residential address. You will also surrender the 
license from your previous state of residence, and take the vision and road 
sign tests. 

• You must take the four-part driver examination (detailed in Chapter 2) if 
any of the following apply to you: 

• You are applying for a new Missouri driver license. 

• Your Missouri driver license has been expired for more than 6 months 
(184 days). 

• Your out-of-state license has been expired for more than 184 days. 

• Your license was revoked because you have too many points (see 
Chapter 1 1) on your driving record or because of an Administrative 
Alcohol action (see Chapter 10). 

• The Director of Revenue asks you to take the exam, even if you have 
a current driver license. 

Required Documents 

When you obtain or renew any license, permit, or nondriver license, you 
will be required to present verification of name, date of birth, place of birth, 
social security number, Missouri residential address, and mailing address, 
if different than residential address. If renewing, you will also be required 
to present and surrender your current license, permit, or nondriver license. 
Details of these requirements are listed below. For more information, visit 
www.dor.mo.gov . 

• Name, Date of Birth, Place of Birtli: A U.S. citizen may show a birth 
certificate issued by a state or local government (with an embossed, 
stamped or raised seal), a valid or expired U.S. passport, a 
Certificate of Citizenship, Certificate of Naturalization, or a Certificate 
of Birth Abroad. A hospital-issued birth certificate is not acceptable. 
U.S. Military Identification Card or Discharge Papers accompanied 
by a copy of U.S. Birth Certificate issued by a state or local 
Government. Non-U. S. citizens must present the appropriate 
immigration documents indicating the applicant's status. 
Examine the full list of acceptable required documents at 
www.dor.mo.gov/mvdl/drivers/idrequirements.pdf . 

Age 65 and Older Exemption — If you are renewing a non-commercial 
permit/driver license or nondriver license and are age 65 or older you are 
exempt from presenting documents for place of birth. 

• Missouri Residential Address: You have a variety of options to prove 
yourcurrent address. Examples includea recent utility bill (including phone, 
electric, gas, water, sewer, and cable) , property tax receipt, most recent bank 
statement, voter ID card, or any official letter issued within the last 30 
days by another state or local governmental agency on its letterhead. 
A Missouri residential address will be required each time you apply to 
renew a driver license, nondriver license, or instruction permit. If you 



11 



are under the age of 21 and cannot provide verification of a IVIissouri 
residential address, a parent or legal guardian may provide such a 
document on your behalf. 

• Resident address is the location at which a person has been physically 
present, and that the person regards as home. A residential address 
is a person's true, fixed, principal, and permanent home, to which a 
person intends to return and remain, even though currently residing 
elsewhere. 

• Social Security Number 

State law requires you to include your Social Security Number (SSN) on 
your application to obtain a Missouri License or permit. The SSN may be 
provided verbally or by presenting the Social Security Card. If the number 
or name associated with the social security number cannot be verified, the 
license office employee may ask to see the Social Security Card or a 
statement from the Social Security Administration as proof of the name 
and SSN in their records. 

If you do not have a social security number, you must sign an affidavit 
stating that you do not have a social security number. If a social security 
number has not been assigned, you must present a letter from the Social 
Security Administration (SSA) regarding the status of your social security 
number. Your application will be sent to the central office for verification. 
Your permit or license will be issued if approved. 

• Name Changes 

If the name on your required documents does not match your current 
name, present one of the documents below showing your correct or 
current name. 

• Last Name Change - certified marriage certificate, certified divorce 
decree, certified court order, certified adoption papers, or amended 
birth certificate, U.S. passport, or social security card or medicare 
card. 

• First Name Change - court order or adoption papers 

• Middle Name Change - court order. 

TIP! Make sure you have all the necessary documents with you before you go 
to your license office. It will save you time and the time of your fellow customers! 



12 



FEES FOR PERMITS 

Fees for and duration of a permit are based on the applicant's age at tlie 
time of the transaction. Application test fees are not included. 



NEW / RENEWAL PERMIT 


TYPE 


MINIMUM 
AGE 


COST 


VALID FOR... 


Student Permit 


15 


$1.00 


Length of Approved Course 


Instruction Permit 


15 


$3.50 


0-12 months 


Motorcycle Permit 


15 1/2 or 16 


$6.25 or $3.50 


0-6 months 


Commercial 
Driver License 
(CDL) Permit 


18 


$7.50 


0-6 months 



FEES FOR LICENSES 

Fees and duration of license are based on the applicant's age at the time of 
the transaction. Application test fees are not included. 



NEW / RENEWAL LICENSE 


TYPE 


MINIMUM 
AGE 


COST 


VALID FOR... 


Intermediate License 


16 


$7.50 


0-2 years 


Full License 
(Class F) 


18 


$10.00 

or 
$20.00 


0-3 years* 
or 

0-6 years* 


For-Hire License 
(Class E) 


18 


$17.50 

or 
$35.00 


0-3 years* 
or 

0-6 years* 


Age 70 with school 
bus endorsement 

New: $7.50 

Renewal: $2.50 


0-1 year 


Commercial 
Driver License 
(Class A, B, or C) 


18 


$22.50 

or 
$45.00 


0-3 years* 
or 

0-6 years* 


Age 70 with school 
bus endorsement 

New: $10.00 

Renewal: $2.50 


0-1 year 


Motorcycle 
Only License 
(Class M) 


16 


$10.00 

or 
$20.00 


0-3 years* 
or 

0-6 years 


Nondriver License 
(ID card) 


any age 


$11.00 


0-6 years* 
or Non-Expiring 


*Based on the applicant's age or document verification status at the time of the transaction. 



13 



RESTRICTIONS 

If you have limited driving experience or a medical condition that impairs your 
ability to drive safely, you may receive a restricted license permitting you to 
drive only under specific conditions. If you have a restricted license, it will have 
one or more of the restriction codes shown below. You may be required to take 
a driving test in order to have a restriction removed from your license. If you 
disobey the restriction(s), you can be charged with driving without a license, 
and if convicted, points will be placed on your driving record. If you receive 
too many points (see Chapter 11), your license may be suspended or revoked. 

RESTRICTION CODES 



A 


Corrective Lenses 


L 


Non-airbrake CDL 


B 


Outside Rearview IVIirror 


M 


Extension on Foot Device 


C 


Daylight Driving Only 


N 


Leg Brace(s) 


D 


Auto Trans/Power Steering 


0 


Foot Operated Emergency Brake 


E 


Seat Cushion 


P 


Accelerator on Steering Column 


F 


Restricted to 45 MPH 


R 


Back Cushion 


G 


25 Mile Radius 


T 


Right Outside Mirror 


H 


Special Hand Devices 


U 


Uncoded Restriction* 


1 


Intermediate License 


W 


3-Wheel Motorcycle Only 


J 


Electrical Turn Signals 


Y 


Left Outside Mirror 


K 


Intrastate CDL Only 


Z 


More than 5 Restrictions 



*An uncoded restriction is any restriction not listed here. Any law 
enforcement officer, judge, or physician can ask the Department of 
Revenue to place restrictions on your license. 

Medical Referral 

There are two reasons you may need a physician's statement when you 
renew or apply for a license: 

• You have had epileptic seizures, convulsions, or blackouts within the 6 
months prior to your application for a license. 

• A driver examiner, license clerk, family member, law enforcement 
officer, physician, physical therapist, occupational therapist, chiropractor, 
registered nurse, psychologist, social worker, professional counselor, 
optometrist, or emergency medical technician, believes you may have 
some other medical condition that would make you an unsafe driver. 
This person must complete the Driver Condition Report (Form 4319) and 
submit it to the Department of Revenue. 

ENDORSEMENTS 

Endorsements are just the opposite of restrictions because they qualify you 
to do things you couldn't do without the endorsement, such as drive a school 
bus or operate a motorcycle. The endorsements available for your non- 
commercial (class F, E, or M) Missouri driver license are listed below. 

• School Bus (S) endorsement — A school bus endorsement is required for 
anyone transporting students from school to home, home to school, and 
to and from school-sponsored events. A school bus endorsement may be 
issued to drivers age 21 or older who hold a Class E (For-Hire) license or 
a commercial license with a Passenger (P) endorsement. A school bus 

14 



endorsement can be suspended for one year if a person fails to pass any 
drug, alcoliol, or chemical test administered in accordance with any federal 
or state law, rule, or regulation regarding the operation of a school bus. 

Missouri law has special operating regulations for school buses. If you 
need more information on school buses, contact: Missouri Department 
of Elementary and Secondary Education, Division of Administrative and 
Financial Services — School Transportation, e-mail: webreply@dmpt. 
dese.mo.gov; phone: (573) 751-0357; fax: (573) 526-6898. 

• Motorcycle (M) endorsement — A motorcycle endorsement on an 
operator or higher class license is required if you operate a motorcycle or 
motortricycle on public roadways. To add the motorcycle endorsement to 
an existing license you will need to pass the motorcycle written test, vision, 
road sign, and a skills test on a motorcycle or motortricycle. For more 
information about Missouri's motorcycle laws, please obtain a copy of the 
Motorcycle Operator Manual at the Missouri Highway Patrol testing station 
or at one of our license offices. 

• Additional endorsements are available if you have a Commercial Driver 
License. For more information, please see the Commercial Driver 
License Manual, available from the Missouri State Highway Patrol, 
license offices, or our web site at www.dor.mo.gov . 

RENEWING A LICENSE OR PERMIT 
Renewal Reminders 

The department will mail you a reminder to renew before your license expires. 
The reminder will be sent to the mailing address on your driver record. When 
you move, you may update your address in one of the following ways: 

• Complete an address change at your local license office; 

• On-line at www.dor.mo.gov; 

• Send an e-mail to dlbmail@dor.mo.gov; or 

• Send a written notice with your new address to the 

Driver License Bureau, P.O. Box 200, Jefferson City, MO 65105-0200. 
Your reminder will state the fee required to renew your license. You can 
renew your license up to 6 months before it expires. Each time you renew, 
you will be required to take the vision and road sign test. 
It is your responsibility to renew your driver license, even if you do not 
receive your reminder. Failure to renew promptly may cause you to have 
to retake the written and driving tests. You can be ticketed for driving 
without a valid license. Exception: If you will be leaving the state/country for 
an extended time you may request an early renewal of your driver license 
at your local license office. 

A driver license may be valid for up to 6 years. If you allow it to expire, you 
must not drive. If you would like to continue driving uninterrupted, you must 
renew your license before it expires. If you do not renew your license within 
6 months (or 184 days) after its expiration date, you will have to take the 
written and driving tests (see Chapter 2), in addition to the vision and road 
sign tests. 



15 



License offices are usually busiest at the end of each month. Since you 
may renew your license up to 6 months (184 days) before it expires, you 
are encouraged to select a time to avoid the longer lines. If the renewal 
dates for your driver license and motor vehicle registration renewal are 
within 6 months, you may be able to complete both renewals at the same 
time and save yourself a trip later to the license office. 

Renewal by Mail for Active Duty Members of the Armed Forces 

Missouri allows renewal by mail for members of the armed forces and their 
dependents. Applicants should submit renewal form 4317 (available on-line 
at http://dor.mo.gov/forms/lndex.php, or faxed upon request), along with 
required documents and fees. 

IVIissouri allows a renewal without re-examination for members of the armed 
forces whose license has expired while out of state, for up to six months 
from honorable discharge or within ninety days of reestablishing residency 
in Missouri, whichever occurs first. The expired Missouri license and 
discharge papers must be submitted at the time of application in addition to 
other applicable renewal documents. The expired license is not valid for 
driving. These provisions only waive re-examination and do not extend the 
actual driving privileges beyond the expiration date. 

Lost, Stolen, or Destroyed License 

If your license expires or is lost or stolen while you are out of state, you 
may request a Mail-In License Application by phone at (573) 751-4600 or 
download the form (DOR-4317) at our web site at www.dor.mo.gov. 
If your license is lost, stolen, or destroyed, you must apply for a duplicate 
license. If your current license expires within the next 6 months, you may 
renew your license early rather than obtain a duplicate license. This saves 
you time and money. 

Renewing When Your License is Suspended or Revoked 

You may take the vision and road sign tests and renew your license even 
while your driving privilege is suspended . However, if your driving privilege 
has been revoked , you may only renew your license during the revocation 
if it resulted from your refusal to take a chemical test, from an "abuse and 
lose" court order, or a minor in possession action. 

You will not receive your license back until you have completed your 
reinstatement requirements and your driving privilege has been reinstated. 

OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRIVER LICENSE 

• Organ, Eye and Tissue Donor Information 

When you apply for a new, renewal, or duplicate instruction permit, driver 
or nondriver license, the contract office will provide information regarding 
the first person consent organ, eye and tissue donor registry. You will be 
asked two very important questions at the time you make your application. 

1 . "Do you authorize a symbol to be placed on your license indicating 
your consent to be listed as an organ, eye and tissue donor in the 
donor registry?" 



16 



If you say "yes", a red heart with a green banner will appear on the front 
of your instruction permit, driver, or nondriver license. Your name will 
automatically be added to the IVIissouri Organ and Tissue Donor Registry 
managed by the IVIissouri Department of Health and Senior Services or 
their agent. The registry is on a secure, confidential database. Joining the 
registry means you have legally documented your decision to save lives 
by becoming an organ and tissue donor at the time of your death. No 
further consent is needed, which relieves your family of making that decision 
on your behalf. There is no fee to place the symbol on your instruction 
permit, driver or nondriver license, or place your name in the registry. 
You may obtain more information regarding the donor registry or register 
your decision and enroll on-line at www.missouriorgandonor.com. 

2. "Would you like to contribute a dollar to the Missouri Organ Donor Fund?" 

Another way to support organ and tissue donation is to make a voluntary 
contribution to the Missouri Organ Donor Fund. Your contribution to the 
fund directly supports registry operation and public education so that 
people are empowered to make an informed decision about donation. 
The registry and educational efforts are supported by contributions only. 

On the back of your instruction permit, driver or nondriver license, space 
is provided to designate any organs you want to donate at the time of 
your death. In other words, an anatomical gift. Write the organ(s) you 
want to donate and sign and date in front of two witnesses. They too 
must sign. There is also a place on the back of the license to indicate 
your Attorney in Fact for health care decisions, including organ donation. 
An Attorney in Fact is someone to whom you give permission to act on 
your behalf. Use a permanent marker when completing the back of 
your driver and nondriver license. 

You are strongly encouraged to inform your family of your decision to be 
an organ, eye, and tissue donor and your decision related to Attorney in 
Fact. Although Missouri law does not require it, keeping everyone 
informed will help avoid confusion or delays. 

• The back of your license also includes areas for you to write your blood 
type and allergic reactions to medicines. If you are in an accident, this 
information could help medical personnel save your life. 

• Blind Awareness Fund 

State law requires the clerk to ask you if you would like to donate $1 to the 
blind awareness fund when you apply for a license, permit, or 
non-driver license. 

• "J88" Notation for Deaf or Hard of Hearing Applicants 

When you apply for or renew your driver license, nondriver license, or 
instruction permit, you may ask that a "J88" notation be placed on your 
driver license, nondriver license, or instruction permit. In the event of an 
emergency, this notation will allow law enforcement or emergency and 
medical personnel to readily determine if you are deaf or hard of hearing. 



17 



This will assist in ensuring effective communications with someone who is 
injured and nonresponsive. In order to obtain the "J88" notation, you must 
request the notation when applying for a license or instruction permit. 
You must have one of the following documents if you wish to have the 
"J88" notation placed on your license or permit: 

• A medical statement from a licensed medical professional, which 
verifies your level of hearing loss. 

• A certified affidavit — The affidavit form (DOR-4942) can be obtained 
from any license office. 

• A statement from an approved or authorized agency listed below, 
which verifies your level of hearing loss. 

Agencies or programs authorized to provide documentation that a license 
or instruction permit applicant is deaf or hearing impaired shall include but 
not be limited to the following: 

• The Missouri Commission for the Deaf 

• Social Security Administration 

• A vocational rehabilitation program 

• A federal, state, or county department of health 

• An Independent Living Center 

The Director of Revenue shall have authorization to review and determine 
acceptability of any documentation from an agency or program not listed. 

• Boater Safety Indicator ^ 

If you are a resident of Missouri who has complied with the provisions of 
section 306.127, RSMo and possess a current Boating Safety Education 
Card issued by the Missouri State Highway Patrol, you may request to 
obtain a boater identification indicator on your driver license or nondriver 
license. The Missouri State Highway Patrol will accept the indicator on 
a valid driver license or nondriver license in lieu of carrying the separate 
Boating Safety Education Card. You must request the new indicator and 
present your valid Boating Safety Education Card at the time of application 
for a new, renewal or duplicate transaction. There will be an additional cost 
of $1 .00 added to standard processing fees when the boater identification 
indicator is initially added to a driver license or nondriver license document. 

• Permanent Disability Indicator 

If you are a resident of Missouri who is permanently disabled you may request 
to have a permanent disability indicator placed on the back of your driver 
license or nondriver license at the time of application for a new, renewal or 
duplicate transaction. To be eligible for the indicator you must submit a Form 
5294 Physicians Statement - Permanent Disability Indicator completed and 
signed by your physician, physical therapist, occupational therapist licensed 
under Chapter 334, RSMo, or other authorized healthcare practitioner. There 
will be no additional cost to add the indicator. The standard new, renewal, or 
duplicate transaction and processing fees will apply. You are not required by 
law to obtain a permanent disability indicator on your driver license or non- 
driver license. The indicator is not determination of eligibility or public benefits. 

• Veteran Designation ^^^^^ 

If you are a veteran of the United States Armed Forces you may opt to have a 
"VETERAN" designation placed on the back of your driver or nondriver license 

18 



at the time of application for a new, renewal or duplicate transaction. To be 
eligible for the designation, you must submit a United States Department of 
Defense discharge document, otherwise known as a DD214 that indicates a 
discharge status of "honorable", "general", "under honorable conditions" or 
"general under honorable conditions". There will be no additional cost to add 
the indicator. The standard new, renewal or duplicate transaction and 
processing fees will apply. You are not required by law to obtain the veteran 
designation. 

• Driver's Privacy Protection Act (DPPA) 

The Federal Driver's Privacy Protection Act requires all states to close the 
personal information contained on all motor vehicle, driver and nondriver 
license records, unless otherwise directed by state law. Under Missouri law, 
a person or entity may access the personal information if exempt under 
the DPPA (and have submitted Form 4678 — Request for Security Access 
Code) or have obtained express consent from the record holder (Form 4681 
- Request from Record Holder). 

• Voter Registration 

When you apply for or renew your driver license, nondriver license, or 
instruction permit, the clerk will ask you if you are registered to vote. If 
you indicate that you are registered to vote, your transaction will be 
completed. If you are not registered, and are interested in becoming 
registered, or need to update your name or address on your voter 
registration card, you may complete an application and it will be forwarded 
to your local election authority. 

• Selective Service Registration 

Male applicants, age 18 to 26, may register with the Selective Service at 
the time of their license or permit application. 

SUSPENSION OR REVOCATION OF YOUR LICENSE 

There are a number of reasons your license may be revoked or suspended 
or denied. Your best bet is to be responsible and be a good driver. You can 
lose your license for any of the following reasons: 

• Parent or Guardian Request to Deny a Driver License — If you are 
under the age 18, your parent or guardian may request that the Director 
of Revenue deny you a license. If you already have a driver license, 
the request (Form 481 1) will cancel your license. When the department 
receives the request, a denial will be placed on your driving record. 
The denial expires when you turn 18 or when your parent or guardian 
requests your driving status be cleared. Form 481 1 may be found on the 
department's web site at www.dor.mo.gov or at any license office. 

• Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs (see Chapter 10) 

• Refusing to let a police officer test you for alcohol or drugs 

• Leaving the scene of an accident 

• Failing to file an accident report (see Chapter 13) 

• Giving false information when you apply for a license 

• Failing to settle a court judgment made against you for damages resulting 
from a motor vehicle accident 

• Failing to keep insurance (financial responsibility) (see Chapter 13) 



19 



• Changing the information on your license or using someone else's license 
when you attempt to buy alcohol 

• Failing to appear for an exam when requested by the Driver License Bureau 

• Using a motor vehicle to commit a felony or causing the death of 
someone in a motor vehicle accident 

• Having too many points on your driving record (see Chapter 11) 

• Letting someone else use your driver license 

• Failing to appear in court or pay traffic tickets in Missouri or other states 

• Failing to pay child support 

• Failing to use an ignition interlock device when required 

• Stealing fuel from a gas station 

• Possessing any intoxicating liquor if you are a minor 

• Submitting false proof of insurance 

• Failing to yield the right-of-way and causing injury or death 

THE GRADUATED DRIVER LICENSE (GDL) LAW 

IVIissouri's Graduated Driver License Law requires all first-time drivers to obtain an 
instruction permit and complete a period of driving with a licensed driver, followed 
by a period of restricted driving (intermediate license), before getting a full license. 

Studies from across the country show that deaths and serious injuries from 
traffic crashes involving young drivers decline by as much as 58 percent 
after a Graduated Driver License Law is implemented. Consider the 
instruction permit as step one, the intermediate license as step two, and the 
full (Under 21) driver license as step three. The following are descriptions of 
each step to help you understand the GDL program. 

STEP ONE: Instruction Permit Eligible Age: 15 Cost: $3.50 
Valid: 0-12 months, based on document verification status 
To Obtain an Instruction Permit: 

• Pass the vision, road sign, and written tests. 

• A parent, stepparent, legal guardian, or certified trainer (with a federal 
residential job training program) must accompany you to the license 
office to sign a permission statement. 

Permit Notes: 

• Under age 16, you may drive only when accompanied in the front 
seat by a parent, stepparent, grandparent, legal guardian, qualified 
driving instructor, or a person who is at least 25 years of age who 
has been licensed for a minimum of 3 years and has received written 
permission from the parent or legal guardian. If your parent, stepparent, 
grandparent, or legal guardian is physically disabled, he or she may 
designate up to two persons to accompany you in the vehicle to provide 
behind-the-wheel instruction. 

• At age 16 or older, you may drive when accompanied in the front seat 
by a person who is at least 21 years old and has a valid driver license. 

• Seat belts must be worn by the driver and all passengers. 

• Your test paper alone is not legal for driving. Be sure to carry your 
permit with you. 

• You may renew your instruction permit as many times as needed 
without taking additional written tests. 

• Free "PERIVIIT DRIVER" window signs are available at all license offices. 



20 



To Graduate to an Intermediate License: 

You must have an instruction permit for a minimum of 6 montlis (182 days) 
beginning tlie day after issuance. 

• You must liave received 40 liours of driving instruction witli a parent, 
stepparent, legal guardian, or certified trainer (with a federal residential 
job training program). The required 40 hours must include at least 10 
hours of nighttime driving. 

STEP TWO: Intermediate License Eligible Age: 16 to 18 Cost: $7.50 
Valid: 0-2 years, based on document verification status 

To Obtain an Intermediate License: 

• You must satisfy the requirements (listed in Step One) to graduate 
from the instruction permit, and hold the instruction permit for at least 
6 months (182 days) beginning the day after issuance. This includes 
having no alcohol-related convictions in the last 12 months and no 
traffic convictions in the last 6 months. 

• A parent, grandparent, stepparent, legal guardian, or certified trainer 
(with a federal residential job training program) must accompany you 
to the license office to verify you have received 40 hours of driving 
instruction with your instruction permit. 

• Pass the vision, road sign, and written tests if previous results are more 
than one year old. 

• Pass the driving test. 
License Notes: 

• Your test paper alone is not legal for driving. Be sure to carry your 
intermediate license with you. 

• Seat belts must be worn by the driver and all passengers. 

• Passenger restrictions outlined below may not be applicable to an 
intermediate license holder who is operating in agricultural work-related 
activities. 

Driving Restrictions: 

• During the first 6 months, you may not operate a motor vehicle with 
more than one passenger who is under the age of 19 and who is not a 
member of your immediate family*. 

• After the first 6 months, you may not operate a motor vehicle with more 
than three passengers who are under 19 years of age and who are not 
members of your immediate family*. 

• You may not drive alone between 1 :00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. except to 
and from a school activity, job, or an emergency, unless accompanied 
by a licensed driver 21 years of age or older. 

* Immediate family shall include parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, 
stepbrothers, stepsisters, and adopted or foster children residing in the 
driver's household. Parent shall include a foster parent, stepparent or 
adoptive parent. Grandparent shall include a foster grandparent, step- 
grandparent or adoptive grandparent. 

To Graduate to a Full Under-21 Driver License: 
- Your driving privilege cannot be suspended, revoked, or denied at the 



21 



time of application. 
- You may not have any alcohol-related offenses or traffic convictions 
within the last 12 months. 

STEP THREE: Full Driver License (Under 21) 

Eligible Age: 18 Cost: $10.00 

Valid: 0-3 years, based on document verification status 

To Obtain the Under-21 Full Driver License: 

• You must satisfy the requirements for an intermediate license. This 
includes having no alcohol-related convictions or traffic convictions in 
the last 12 months. 

• Have a valid intermediate license. Your driving privilege cannot be 
suspended, revoked, or denied when you apply for a full driver license. 

• Pass the vision and road sign recognition tests. (You are not required 
to pass the written and driving tests if already completed.) 

If you are under 21 years of age, the Department of Revenue will issue you 
a license identifying you as a minor. When you become 21 years old, you 
may apply and pay for another driver license (without the minor indication) 
or wait until your under-21 driver license expires. 

You are encouraged to study this Driver Guide before you attempt the written 
exam. Almost 50 percent of all test-takers fail the first time. You will have a 
much better chance of passing your test if you take time to review this Guide. 



22 



A CHECKLIST FOR YOU 0 

You must have the following documents with you when you apply for a Missouri 
driver license, instruction permit, or nondriver license. Take all the documents with 
you to a contract office when you apply for your license or permit. 



NEW MISSOURI RESIDENT TRANSFERRING AN OUT-OF-STATE DRIVER 
LICENSE (valid or expired no more than 184 days) 

D Out-of-state driver license (valid or expired no more than 184 days) 

□ Verification of name, date of birth, place of birth, social security 
number, and Missouri residential address* 

NOTE: If you are upgrading your driver license, take the above documents 
with you to a Missouri State Highway Patrol (MSHP) examination location 
when you take the written, vision, and road sign tests and/or driving test. 



FIRST-TIME APPLICANT 

Verification of name, date of birth, place of birth, social security 
number, and Missouri residential address* 

D Driver Examination Record (DOR-100) indicating successful completion 
of tests (not required for nondriver license) 



RENEWAL LICENSE 

D All drivers renewing will have to show verification of name, date of 
birth, place of birth, social security number, and Missouri residential 
address* 

Exemption: If you are renewing a non-commercial permit/driver license 
or nondriver license and are age 65 or older you are exempt from 
presenting documents for place of birth. 



*Please refer to the list of acceptable documents in this chapter. 

Note: Additional docunnents and verification of SSN may be required 
if the documentation submitted is questionable, or if the contract 
office clerk or MSHP examiner has reason to question the validity or 
authenticity of the documents, or needs further verification. 



23 



CHAPTER 2 — THE DRIVER EXAM 



THE DRIVER EXAMINATION 

The driver examination consists of a four-part test: 

• A written test on traffic laws and rules for safe driving 

• A vision test 

• A road sign test 

• A driving test (skills) 

You should be prepared to take the driver exam if: 

• You are applying for a new IVIissouri driver license. 

Note: If you have a driver license from another state that is valid or has 
been expired for less than 184 days, and you are applying for the same type 
of license in Missouri, you only have to take the vision and road sign tests. 

• Your Missouri driver license is expired for more than 6 months (184 days). 

• The Director of Revenue asks you to take the exam, even if you have a 
current driver license. 

• Your license was revoked: 

-because you have too many points on your driving record, 
-because of an Administrative Alcohol action (see Chapter 10). 

Where to Take the Exam 

The Missouri State Highway Patrol (MSHP) administers the driver examination. 
To find the testing center nearest you, contact the MSHP or the Department 
of Revenue. The phone numbers for the Department of Revenue and MSHP 
are at the back of this guide. You can also find these locations on the MSHP 
web site: www.mshp.dps.missouri.gov. 

Verification of Your Name and Age 

Before you can take the driver exam, you must prove your legal name and 
age. This identification must also be shown to the Department of Revenue 
when applying for a driver license or permit and any time you take the written 
or driving tests. (Refer to Chapter 1 for a list of acceptable documents for 
verification of name, date of birth, place of birth, social security number, and 
Missouri residential address.) 
Written Test 
Driver License (Class F) 

If you are applying for a Class F (operator) license, you must take a 25 
question multiple-choice written test. The questions will be on the laws and 
methods of driving covered in this Guide. The test is NOT an open book 
test. You will not be tested on the information on commercial vehicles in 
Chapter 15. 

For-Hire License (Class E) 

If you are applying for a Class E (for-hire) license, you must take a special 
written test. The questions will be on the laws and methods of driving 
covered in this Guide but will also include the information on commercial 
vehicles found in Chapter 15. The test is NOT an open book test. 

Vision Test 

You must take an acuity vision test and a peripheral (side) vision test when 
you apply for any new or renewal driver license or permit. The standard 
minimum acuity is at least 20/40 with either or both eyes. If you wear glasses 

24 



or contact lenses, you may need them for the vision test. The standard 
minimum peripheral reading is at least 55 degrees in each eye or 85 degrees 
in one eye. If you are unable to meet the vision standards as required, you 
may be denied a license, or restrictions may be placed on your license. 

If you fail the standard vision test, the examiner will give you a vision 
exam form that your eye specialist or physician must fill out. If the 
physician prescribes glasses or contact lenses to correct your vision, you 
may have to wait for the glasses (or contact lenses) before the written and/ 
or driving tests may be given. If both your natural and corrected acuity 
vision are worse than 20/160, or your peripheral combined is worse than 70 
degrees, you cannot take the driving test and cannot have a driver license. 

Road Sign Test 

The road sign test will check your ability to recognize and understand traffic 
signs. 

Driving Test 

After you pass the written, vision, and road sign tests, you may then take 
the driving test. You will take the driving test with a driver license examiner 
of the Missouri State Highway Patrol. 

The examiner will check your vehicle for the required equipment. The 
examiner will also check your vehicle for its safe operating condition. You 
cannot take the test if the vehicle is not properly equipped, or the examiner 
believes that giving the test will be dangerous. 

You should take the test in a vehicle that is familiar to you. The vehicle 
must have: 

• Current license plate(s) and a valid inspection sticker. 

• Seat belts in proper working order. 

• Doors in proper working order for the driver and examiner. 

• A clean, safe seat for the examiner. 

• Two sets of brakes (parking and a foot brake) in good working order. 

• A horn in good working order. 

You will drive, and the examiner will sit beside you. No one else may ride 
in the vehicle during the test. Avoid unnecessary conversation with the 
examiner, and focus on your driving. Remember the examiner's job is to 
test, not to teach. You must obey all Missouri traffic laws at all times. 

THE EXAMINER WILL ASK YOU TO FIND AND USE THE VEHICLE'S 
CONTROLS, such as the accelerator, brakes, turn signals, windshield 
wipers, etc. You will be tested for: 

• Finding the control without searching. 

• Using the control correctly. 

THE EXAMINER WILL ASK YOU TO START DRIVING. You will be 
tested for: 

• Starting the vehicle. 

• Releasing the parking brake. 

• Looking to see if the way is clear. 

• Giving the proper signal. 

• Driving smoothly and at the correct speed. 



25 



THE EXAMINER WILL TELL YOU WHERE TO DRIVE. TURN. STOP, ETC. 

After the examiner tells you what to do, you will have enough time to look 
for traffic and to drive as asked. You will be asked to do the following: 

1. Start and stop the vehicle. You will be tested for: 

• The smoothness and safety of your starts and stops. 

• Your reaction time. 

• Your control of the vehicle when stopping. 

2. Park parallel to the curb, in a space 25 feet long and 7 feet wide. 
You will be tested for: 

• The position of your vehicle before backing. 

• Whether or not you bump into the space markers. 

• Moving into the space smoothly and at the right speed. 

• Parking no more than 18" from the curb. 

• Parking near the center of the space. 

• Ability to park the vehicle within two minutes. 

• Turning the wheels in the correct direction for parking. 

• Checking traffic and signaling before you leave the parking space. 

3. Backing. You will be tested for: 

• Looking over your right shoulder to see through the rear glass. 

• Whether your vehicle backs in a straight line or weaves. 

• Staying in the proper lane of traffic. 

• Backing at the right speed. 

4. Make at least two right and two left turns. You will be tested for: 

• Driving in the correct lane for turning. 

• Giving the proper turn signal at the proper time. 

• Turning into the proper lane. 

• Making proper traffic checks. 

• Turning at the right speed. 

• Your control of the vehicle. 

5. Park on a hill. You will be tested for: 

• Your control of the vehicle. 

• Parking no more than 18" from the curb. 

• Leaving your vehicle in park or the correct gear. 

• Turning the front wheels in the correct direction for parking. 

• Setting the parking brake. 

• Checking traffic and signaling. 

6. Enter and leave intersections. You will be tested for: 

• Understanding and obeying the traffic signs and lights. 

• Your speed when approaching an intersection. 

• Your awareness of the traffic around you. 

• Driving in the correct lane. 

• Yielding the right-of-way without blocking traffic. 

• Making a full stop at the proper place at stop signs. 

7. Understand and obey traffic signs and signals. You will be tested for: 

• Noticing and obeying traffic signs and signals. 



26 



THE EXAMINER WILL WATCH FOR YOUR USE OF GOOD DRIVING 



RULES. You will be tested for: 

• The distance between your veliicle and tlie veliicle in front of you. 

• Your speed wliile driving. 

• Driving in tlie proper lane and obeying lane markings. 

• Your awareness of the traffic around you. 

• Yielding the right-of-way when necessary. 

Your Grade 

Throughout the driving test, the examiner will subtract points for any driving 
errors you make. If you lose more than 30 points, you will fail the test. You 
will also fail the test if you: 

• Are in a traffic accident with another vehicle and it is your fault 

• Hit a pedestrian 

• Drive so dangerously you might have caused an accident 

• Violate a traffic law 

• Refuse to drive as the examiner asks 

When you pass the driving skills test, you will be given a form with your test 
results. Before you drive, you must apply and obtain a license at a license 
office. The test result form itself is not valid for driving. 

Failing the Driving Test 

If you fail the driving test, the examiner will suggest that you practice before 
retaking the test. You may take only one driving test per day. 

If you fail the driving test three times, no further tests will be allowed 
without written authorization from the Department of Revenue. The 

driver examiner will give you a form that you must send to the department. 
After you send the form to the department, you will receive a letter from the 
department requiring additional behind-the-wheel driver training. 
You must send proof of the additional driver training before you will be 
allowed to take the driving test again. 

Fraud 

It is a crime to commit fraud. Anyone who makes a false unsworn statement 
or affidavit or who commits or assists another person in committing fraud or 
deception during any examination process for a Missouri license, permit, or 
nondriver license, is guilty of fraud. Fraud is a Class "A" misdemeanor that 
may result in the loss of your driving privilege for up to one year. 

Some examples of fraud could include cheating, or using or attempting to 
use any recording, photographic, or two-way communicating device during 
any testing process. 



27 



CHAPTER 3 — PAVEMENT MARKINGS, TRAFFIC 
SIGNS, LIGHTS, AND SIGNALS 



PAVEMENT MARKINGS ON THE ROAD 

Lines and symbols on the roadway indicate a number of things to drivers: 
where lanes are divided, where you may pass other vehicles, or change 
lanes, which lanes to use for turns, where pedestrian walkways are located, 
and where you must stop for signs and traffic signals. 

MEANINGS OF PAVEMENT MARKINGS 

LINES — BROKEN LINES may be crossed in a passing maneuver. 

— SOLID LINES should not be crossed in a passing maneuver. 

COLORS — YELLOW divides oncoming traffic. 

— WHITE divides same-direction traffic. 

DIRECTION OF TRAFFIC 

If the line on the left of you is YELLOW, the traffic on the other side of the 
line is moving in the OPPOSITE direction. 

When the line on the left of you is WHITE, the traffic is moving in the SAME 
direction. A solid white line marks the right edge of many roads. 

The center marking for roads with four lanes consists of TWO SOLID 
YELLOW LINES. The yellow lines tell you the traffic on the other side of 
the lines is moving in the opposite direction. You should never cross the 
two solid yellow lines to pass. 



r 



NO PASSING ZONES 

Two-lane roads may have "no passing zones" marked with a SOLID 
YELLOW LINE. No passing zones are on hills or curves where you cannot 
see far enough ahead to pass safely. You must complete passing before 
you enter the no passing zone. 



NO PASSING ZONE 



NO PASSING ZONE ■ 



28 



When you see a solid yellow line on your side of tlie center line, do not try 
to pass. On any two-lane road, never pass if you cannot see the road is 
clear for the distance you need to mal<e a pass, even if there is no marl<ing 
on the roadway. 

LEFT-TURN LANES 

Some roads have marked left-turn lanes. Notice the solid yellow lines and 
the thick yellow stripes in the illustration below. 




CROSSWALKS AND STOP LINES 

When required to stop because of a sign or signal, you must stop before 
your vehicle reaches the stop line or, if there is one, the crosswalk. 
Crosswalks define the area where pedestrians are to cross the roadway. 
You must yield to pedestrians in or about to enter a crosswalk. Not 
all crosswalks are marked. Be alert for pedestrians when crossing 
intersections that do not have defined crosswalks. 

DUAL USE LANES 

Dual use lanes have both a turn arrow and a straight arrow. When both 
arrows appear on the electric traffic signal, you may either turn or go 
straight. But if you want to turn, and only the straight arrow is showing, you 
must wait for the turn arrow. 




29 



REVERSIBLE EXPRESS LANES 

Some travel lanes are designed to carry traffic in one direction at certain 
times and in tlie opposite direction at other times. Tliese lanes are usually 
marked by double-dashed yellow lines. Before you start driving in them, 
checl< to see which lanes you can use at that time. There may be signs 
posted by the side of the road or overhead. Sometimes special lights are 
used. A green arrow means you can use the lane beneath it; a red "X" 
means you may not. 

SHARED CENTER LANES 

Vehicles moving in both directions may use these center lanes for making 
left turns (or U-turns when they are permitted). On the pavement, left-turn 
arrows for traffic in one direction alternate with left-turn arrows for traffic 
coming from the other direction. These lanes are marked on each side by 
a solid yellow and dashed yellow lines. Turn from this lane as soon as your 
path is clear. 

NO LANE MARKINGS 

When there are no signs or markings to control the use of lanes, there are 
rules that indicate which lane is to be used. These rules cover general 
driving, passing, and turning. 

General Driving — In general, never back a vehicle in any travel lane. 
Drivers do not expect a vehicle to be backing towards them and may not 
realize it until it is too late. If you miss your turn or exit, do not back up. 
Go on to where you can safely turn around. Do not stop in travel lanes 
for any reason (confusion, breakdown, or letting out a passenger). Keep 
moving until you can safely pull off the road. 

On a road with three or more lanes traveling in the same direction, stay in 
the right lane except to pass. If there is a considerable amount of traffic 
entering the right travel lane, then use the center travel lane. 

Passing — On multi-lane roads, the left-most lane is intended to be used 
to pass slower vehicles. If you pass on the right, the other driver may 
have difficulty seeing you and might suddenly change lanes in front of you. 
Never pass on the shoulder. Other drivers will not expect you to be there 
and may pull off the road without looking. 

TRAFFIC OFFICERS 

You must obey traffic officers at all times. If you see a traffic officer giving 
directions, do what he or she says and ignore any traffic signs or signals. 
For example, if the officer signals for you to stop at a green light, you must 
stop. 

TRAFFIC SIGNALS 

Traffic signals are lights that tell you when or where to stop and go. 



30 




FLASHING SIGNAL - ALL DIRECTIONS 

Flashing traffic signals may occur during emergencies, night 
time/low traffic volume periods and special events. Flashing 
traffic signals have the following meanings: 

• A flashing red light means the same thing as a stop sign. 

• A flashing yellow light tells you to slow down and proceed 
with caution. 

TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNALS 

Traffic controls include traffic signals, traffic signs and pavement marl<ings. 
Traffic control also can be provided by law enforcement, highway personnel 
or school crossing guards. You must obey directions from these persons. 

A RED LIGHT tells you to stop at the stop line, crosswall< or before 
the intersection. Unless you are making a right turn, you must 
wait for the signal to turn green before you proceed. After making 
a complete stop, you may turn right on a red light if the way is clear of 
pedestrians and traffic. However, you must not turn right on a red light 
when there is a "NO RIGHT TURN ON RED" sign posted. 

□ A STEADY YELLOW LIGHT tells you the traffic signal is changing 
from green to red. Stop for a steady yellow light unless you are 
within the intersection or are so close that you cannot safely stop 
before entering the intersection. 



□ 



A GREEN LIGHT tells you that you can go through the intersection. 
However, you must first yield the right-of-way to traffic and 
pedestrians who are still in the intersection. 



Left Turn Signals: When turning left at a green light, there 
are three types of left-turn signal phases: 

1 . Permissive — Vehicles are given a circular green or a 
flashing yellow arrow and required to wait for an adequate 
gap in the opposing traffic prior to making their turn. 

2. Protected — Vehicles may turn only when they receive 
a green arrow while opposing vehicles are stopped by a 
red light. This type of control is commonly signed "left turn 
signal." 

3. Protected/Permissive — Vehicles are given a protected 
phase (green arrow), or a permissive (circular green or 
flashing yellow arrow) phase, when drivers must choose an 
adequate gap in opposing traffic. This type of control, when 
used with a circular green, is commonly signed "left turn 
yield on green". 



A STEADY YELLOW ARROW appears after a green arrow. It tells 
you the green arrow will be changing to a circular green light, a 
flashing yellow arrow or a red light. You must be ready to yield the 
right-of-way to oncoming traffic or to stop. 



31 




2^^B0m A FLASHING YELLOW ARROW tells you that you are allowed 
" K^Di ^|.jyg ^i^g direction the arrow is pointing but are required to 
wait for an adequate gap in the opposing traffic prior to mal<ing 
your turn. 

A GREEN ARROW tells you that you can drive in the direction the 
arrow is pointing. You must be in the proper lane and the way must 
be clear of all traffic and pedestrians. 

Dark signals, or traffic signals that aren't working operate as a 4-way stop. 

LANE USE CONTROL SIGNALS 

Lane use control signals tell you which lanes you may drive in on a 
roadway. You will see these signals directly over the lane they control. 
Red "X" — Do not drive in this lane. 
Green Arrow — You may use this lane. 



If you are driving in a green arrow lane and the arrow turns to a red "X," do 
not panic. The oncoming traffic will not receive a green arrow for that lane 
until you have had time to change lanes. 

TRAFFIC SIGNS 

Traffic signs tell you about traffic rules, hazards, where you are, how to get 
where you are going and where services are located. The shape and color 
of these signs give clues to the type of information they provide. 



SIGN COLORS 

^1 Red = Stop, Yield, or Prohibited 

Yellow = Warning 
^1 Black = Regulatory 

White = Regulatory 

■ Brown = Public Recreation 
& Cultural Interests 



Yellow-Orange = Road Signs 
^1 Orange = Construction 

Green = Direction and Distance 
^1 Blue = Motorist Services 



32 



SIGN SHAPES 




Round = Railroad 




Crossbuck = Railroad 




WARNING SIGNS 

These signs are yellow with black lettering or symbols and usually diamond 
shaped. These signs warn you to slow down and be prepared to stop 
if necessary because a special situation or a hazard is ahead. Some 
common warning signs are shown below. 



TRAFFIC CONTROL 




Bicycle Crossing Signal Ahead 

Yield to bicycle riders on any bike There is a traffic light signal ahead 

trail which crosses a road. on the road you are on. Be 

prepared to stop. 



33 



Pedestrian Crossing 

Yield to pedestrians wall<ing in tlie 
crosswall<. Slow Down. 



TRAFFIC FLOW 



EXIT 



30 

M P H 



Speed Advisory-Highway Ramp 

The highway entry/exit ramp has 
a speed advisory. 




Begin Divided Roadway 

The road will soon become two- 
way traffic divided by a median or 
barrier. 



School Crossing 

Slow down. Watch for children 
crossing the road. 
Note: This sign is being transi- 
tioned to neon green. This transi- 
tion will take effect within the next 
10 years. 




Added Lane 

Traffic from another road will be 
entering the road. No merging 
is necessary because a lane has 
been added. 




End Divided Roadway 

Two-way traffic will no longer be 
divided by a median or barrier. 



34 





Merge 

Traffic from another road will be 
entering tlie road. Be prepared 
for vehicles to move into your 
lane. 



Lane Ends/Merge Left 

Two lanes of traffic will soon 
become one lane of traffic. If you 
are in the right lane you must 
merge left, yielding to traffic 
driving in the left lane. 



TURNS AND CURVES IN THE ROAD 




Curve Sign 

A curve sign is used to warn of a 
curve where the recommended 
speed is less than the posted 
speed limit for the highway. 




Reverse Turn 

A reverse turn sign is used to 
warn of two turns in opposite 
directions. The second turn 
may be sharper than the first. 
Recommended maximum speed 
is 30 mph or less. 




Right Angle Turn 

A turn sign is used to warn of a 
sharp turn or turn where the 
recommended maximum speed is 
30 mph or less. 



35 

MPH 



Speed Advisory 

Curve and turn signs have an 
advisory speed plate that shows 
the recommended speed for 
the curve or turn. Although you 
may feel comfortable driving at a 
higher speed in fair weather, you 
should never do so in rain, snow 
or icy conditions. 



35 



Large Arrow 

May be seen on the outside of a 
turn. Slow down for sharp change 
of direction of travel. 



Chevron 

May be used instead of the large 
arrow sign to outline the edge of a 
curving road or to supplement the 
large arrow sign. 



SPECIAL ROAD/TRAFFIC CONDITIONS 




Object Marker 

Are used to notify drivers of 
objects in the roadway or very 
close to the edge of the roadway. 
This sign emphasizes the need 
to not stray outside of the marked 
travel lane. 




Slow Moving Vehicle 

A reflective orange triangle on 
the rear of a vehicle means it is 
traveling less than 25 mph. You 
may see this sign on construction 
equipment or farm vehicles. 




Soft Shoulder 

The shoulder on the side of the 
road ahead is soft. Do not drive 
off the pavement. 




Slippery When Wet 

The road ahead becomes 
unusually slippery in wet weather. 
Drive carefully in these conditions. 



36 



ROAD INTERSECTIONS 




Side Road Railroad Crossing 

A warning of a railway crossing 
very close to the intersection. 
Use caution when crossing tracks. 




Side Road Ahead 

Another road enters the road from 
the direction shown on the sign. 



Roundabout Ahead 

A roundabout intersection is 
ahead. Slow down as required by 
the speed restriction sign and 
follow the road rules for 
roundabouts. 




Intersection 

Another road crosses the road. 
Watch carefully for traffic crossing 
your path. 




T Intersection Ahead 

The road you are traveling does 
not continue. You must turn 
either right or left. 




ROUNDABOUT 



REGULATORY SIGNS 

Many regulatory signs are square or rectangular-shaped and are white, 
with black or red letters or symbols. They give you information about rules 
for traffic direction, lane use, turning, speed, parking, and other special 
situations. 

Some regulatory signs have a red circle with a red slash over a symbol. 
These indicate you cannot do something, for example, no left turn or no 
U-turn. 



37 



^^^^^ IV^^K^ l^^^^^ 

No Left Turn No Right Turn No U- Turn 




No Trucks 



No Bicycles 



Other common types of regulatory signs are: 
STOP SIGN 

A stop sign is red witli wliite letters and has eight 
sides. When you see a stop sign, you must come 
to a full stop. 



You must wait until crossing vehicles and pedestrians 
have cleared the intersection. You must stop at the 
stop line if one is present even if it is located past the 
stop sign. If there is no stop line, pull up and stop near the edge of the 
intersection, look both ways, and then proceed when it is safe. 



a. Stop before the 
stop line. 
OR... 




b. Stop before the 

crosswalk. 

OR... 



c. If there is no 
stop line or 
crosswalk, 
stop before 
entering the 
intersection. 



38 



YIELD SIGN 

A yield sign is triangular. It is red and white with 
red letters. It means you must slow down and 
yield the right-of-way to traffic in the intersection 
you are crossing or roadway you are entering. 



WRONG WAY SIGN 

You made a wrong turn and have entered a lane 
of oncoming traffic. As quickly and safely as 
possible, pull off the road, turn around and go back. 



DO NOT ENTER SIGN 

When you see this sign at roadway openings, 
do not enter this road. 




WRONG 
WAY 




LENTERi 



LANE CONTROL SIGNS 

These signs use an arrow symbol to tell you which direction you can go 
from each lane. The signs are along the road or hanging over the road. 





t 


r 


ONLY 


ONLY 


ONLY 



SPEED LIMIT SIGNS 

Speed limit signs indicate the maximum speed allowed 
by law, and do not mean that all parts of the road can 
be safely driven at those speeds under all conditions. 
The speed limit is the maximum allowable speed in ideal 
conditions. Adjust your speed for hills, curves, slippery 
roadways, limited sight distance, pedestrians, bicyclists, 
and slow-moving vehicles. These conditions may make 
the posted speed limit unsafe. By law, when conditions 
demand it, you must slow down. Interstate highways also 
have minimum speed limits. If this minimum speed is too 
fast for you, then you should use another route. You may 
not drive slower than 40 mph on interstate highways 
under normal roadway conditions. 



SPEED 
LIMIT 

70 

MINIMUM 

40 



39 



Use the following guide unless posted speed limits direct othen/vise. 



ROADWAY 


MAXIMUM SPEED 


Rural interstates and freeways 


70 


Rural expressways 


65 


Interstate highways, freeways or expressways 
within urbanized areas 


60 


All other roads and highways not located in an 
urbanized area 


60 


Lettered roads 


55 



The speed limit in any city, town, or village is 25 mph, unless posted 
othen/vise. The Missouri Highway and Transportation Commission has the 
authority to set speed limits higher or lower than the uniform maximum 
speed limits for safety reasons or to expedite the flow of traffic. There are 
13 interstates in Missouri. The speed limit is posted 60 mph when these 
interstates are near or within the following five Missouri cities: St. Louis, 
Kansas City, Columbia, St. Joseph, and Springfield. 

RAILROAD CROSSING SIGN 

Many railroad crossings have signs or signals to warn drivers. The round 
advance warning sign tells you that you are nearing a railroad crossing. 
Never try to beat a train across the tracks. Never start to cross the tracks 
until there is room for your vehicle on the other side of the tracks. It is not 
wise to shift gears when crossing railroad tracks, just in case your vehicle 
might stall. 




You may also see a pavement marking before a crossing. Like the round 
advance warning sign, pavement markings tell you that you are nearing a 
railroad crossing. 



40 



A white, X-shaped sign or "crossbucl<" is located at tlie railroad 
crossing. This sign has the same meaning as a "yield" sign; 
therefore, you must yield to trains at crossings. The sign under 
the crossbucl< tells you how many tracks cross the road. 
At some crossings, along with the crossbucl< sign, you will 
see side-by-side red lights that flash alternately. At some 
crossings there is also a crossing gate (some with a bell) 
that will lower when a train is coming. At both of these 
signal-equipped crossings, you must stop and you cannot 
cross the tracks until the train has passed. 

When you see any of these signs, SLOW DOWN, look for 
a train, and be ready to stop. You must STOP if the red 
lights are flashing or the gate is down. You must stop within 
15 to 50 feet before the railroad tracks. DO NOT try to go 
around the gate. 




The red lights may 
continue to flash after 

the train has gone by. If there are two or more tracks, look for 
a second train before you cross. 

WORK ZONE SIGNS 

Work zone signs are fluorescent orange and indicate some type of work is 
being performed on or along side the roadway. Be extremely careful when 
you see these signs. There may be other traffic control devices or flag 
persons to help direct you safely through the work zone. 

If you are caught speeding or passing in a construction zone or work zone 
on Missouri state roadways, you could be fined a minimum of $250 for the 
first offense and a minimum of $300 for a second or subsequent offense 
in addition to any other fine authorized by law according to State Statute 
304.582. 




41 



GUIDE SIGNS 

These signs are square or rectangular, and are green or brown with white 
lettering. They show direction and distance to various locations such as 
cities, airports, and state lines, or to special areas such as national parks, 
historical areas, and museums. 

SERVICE SIGNS 

These signs are square or rectangular, and are blue with white letters or 
symbols. They show the location of various services, such as rest areas, 
gas stations, campgrounds, and hospitals. 




i 





ROUTE SIGNS 

The shape of route signs indicates the type of roadway: interstate. United 
States, state, or county. When planning a trip, use a highway map to 
determine your route. During the trip, follow the route signs. This will help 
you so you will not get lost. 

North-south routes are identified by odd numbers. East-west roads are 
identified by even numbers. Interstate highways that loop around cities are 
identified by three-digit even numbers. Roadways that direct traffic into a 
city's road system (called "spurs") are identified by three-digit odd numbers. 

Understanding exit numbers is easy when you know interstates traveling 
west/east are numbered starting from the west and going east. This means 
exit numbers start at zero and increase as you drive east. Likewise, if you 
come from the east, the numbers will decrease to the west. Interstates that 
travel north/south have their exits numbered beginning at the south point 
and increasing north. If you enter the state from the north and drive south, 
then the exit numbers decrease. 



EMERGENCY REFERENCE MARKERS 

Emergency reference markers are mile markers placed along the outside 
shoulder to mark the edge of the roadway and convey information to 
drivers about their location on the interstate for navigation and emergency 
situations. The reference markers are located every two-tenths of a mile, 
so motorists will always be in sight of a sign. They tell the direction of travel 
and route number. 



42 



CHAPTER 4 — RULES OF THE ROAD 



Your highest duty as a motorist is to drive your vehicle carefully and prudently. 
Your speed and manner of driving must create a safe environment for yourself 
and other road users, including pedestrians, cyclists, and other motorists. 

RIGHT-OF-WAY 

Where vehicles or pedestrians are likely to meet one another, and there 
are no signs or signals to regulate traffic, there are rules that say who must 
yield the right-of-way. These rules tell drivers who goes first and who must 
wait in different traffic situations. 

The law says who must yield the right-of-way; it does not give any driver 
the right-of-way. You must do everything you can to prevent striking a 
pedestrian or another vehicle, regardless of the circumstances. 

PASSING 

Passing is a dangerous maneuver where the dangers are compounded 
by intersections, other vehicles within an intersection and two-lane roads 
(Refer to No Passing Zones in Chapter 3). 

If you are caught speeding or passing in a construction zone or work zone on 
Missouri state roadways, you could be fined a minimum of $250 for the first 
offense and a minimum of $300 for a second or subsequent offense in addition 
to any other fine authorized by law according to State Statute 304.582. 
Use the same care when passing a pedestrian or cyclist as when passing a 
motor vehicle. You may need to slow down and wait for a safe opportunity to 
pass a pedestrian or cyclist, just as you would for any other slow-moving traffic. 

Passing on the Right 

The driver of a motor vehicle may overtake and pass to the right of another 
vehicle only under the following conditions: 

• When the vehicle overtaken is making or about to make a left turn; 

• Upon a city street with unobstructed pavement of sufficient width for two 
or more lines of vehicles in each direction; 

• Upon a one-way street; 

• Upon any highway outside of a city with unobstructed pavement of 
sufficient width and clearly marked for four or more lanes of traffic. 

In no event shall such movement be made by driving off the paved or 
main traveled portion of the roadway (shoulder). 

Passing on the Left 

No vehicle shall at any time be driven to the left side of the roadway under 
the following conditions: 

• When approaching the crest of a grade or upon a curve of the highway where 
the driver's view is obstructed within such distance as to create a hazard in 
the event another vehicle might approach from the opposite direction; 

• When the view is obstructed upon approaching within one hundred feet 
of any bridge, viaduct, or tunnel; 

• When approaching within one hundred feet of or at any intersection or 
railroad grade crossing; or 

• When there is a solid yellow line. 

43 



INTERSECTIONS 

The following right-of-way rules apply at Intersections: 

• Drivers must yield where necessary to avoid striking pedestrians who are 
legally crossing the road. 

• Drivers crossing a sidewalk, entering or exiting a driveway, alley, or 
parking lot must yield to pedestrians. It is illegal to drive on a sidewalk 
except to cross. 

• Drivers turning left must yield to oncoming vehicles going straight. 

• At a four-way stop, the driver reaching the intersection first may proceed 
before the other drivers (after coming to a complete stop). 

• Drivers entering a road from a driveway, alley, or roadside must yield to 
vehicles already on the main road. 

• At an intersection where there is no stop sign or traffic signal (with the 
exception of roundabouts), drivers must yield to vehicles coming from the 
right. 

• When approaching a roundabout intersection, always yield to traffic in 
the circle and pedestrians in the crosswalks. Wait for a gap in traffic 
before entering. 

EMERGENCY VEHICLES 

You must yield the right-of-way to police, fire, ambulance, or any other 
emergency vehicles using a siren or air horn, and a red or blue flashing light. 
Pull over to the right edge of the road, or as near to the right as possible, 
when you see or hear an emergency vehicle approaching from any direction. 
If you are in an intersection, drive through the intersection before you pull 
over. Remain stopped until the emergency vehicle passes. Follow any 
instructions given over the emergency vehicle's loudspeaker. Emergency 
vehicles may follow each other so proceed only when the way is clear. 

When approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying lighted red or 
red and blue lights, you must: 

• Proceed with caution, and if it is safe to do so, make a lane change 
into a lane not adjacent to the stationary vehicle (if on a roadway having 
at least four lanes with not less than two lanes proceeding in the same 
direction as the approaching vehicle); or 

• Proceed with due caution and reduce the speed of the vehicle, 
maintaining a safe speed for road conditions, if changing lanes would be 
unsafe or impossible. 

For more information regarding the "Move Over Law" see page 116. 

SCHOOL BUSES 

When a school bus stops to load or unload school children, the driver 
activates the mechanical and electrical signaling devices to notify other 
drivers of an impending stop. Amber warning lights will flash 500 feet 
before the bus comes to a designated stop. When the school bus is 
stopped, the alternate flashing red lights and the stop signal arm are 
activated. Oncoming and following traffic must stop before they reach the 
bus when these signals are activated. You must stop: 



44 




1 . On a 2-lane road where the vehicles travel in either direction. 

2. On a 2-lane road that is a one-way street. 

No driver of a school bus shall take on or discharge passengers at any 
location upon a highway consisting of four or more lanes of traffic, whether 
or not divided by a median or barrier, in such a manner as to require the 
passengers to cross more than two lanes of traffic. The following are situa- 
tions when you do not have to stop: 

1 . When you are traveling the opposite direction of a school bus on a high- 
way divided by a median where the vehicles traveling one direction are on 
a totally separate road from the vehicles traveling the opposite direction; 

2. When you are traveling the opposite direction of a school bus on a high- 
way containing four or more lanes of traffic; or 

3. When a school bus is stopped in a loading zone (at a school) where stu- 
dents are not permitted to cross the roadway. 

After stopping for a school bus that is unloading school children, watch 
for school children walking along the side of the road. You must remain 
stopped until the bus moves or the bus driver signals for you to proceed. 
Proceed with caution. 

HAND AND VEHICLE SIGNALS 

Before you stop, turn or change lanes, let the other drivers know what you 
are going to do by signaling. You can signal with your hand and arm or 
with your vehicle's turn signals and brake lights. You should signal at least 
100 feet before you turn so the other drivers can be ready. Check your 
vehicle's turn signals often to ensure they are working properly. 

The pictures below show the correct hand signals to use when turning or 
stopping. 

TURNS 




As a good driver, you should get into the proper turn lane and signal at 
least 100 feet before you turn. Before you make any turn, you should look 
both ways for oncoming traffic or pedestrians. 

45 



If there are no signs or lane markings to control turning, you should turn 
from the lane that is closest to the direction you want to go, and turn into 
the lane closest to the one you came from. This way, you will cross the 
fewest lanes of traffic. When making turns, go from one lane to the other as 
smoothly as possible without crossing lane lines or interfering with traffic. 
Once you have completed your turn, you can change to another lane if you 
need to. 

U-TURNS 

You should only make a U-turn when it is 
safe. U-turns should not be made on any 
curve or near the crest of a hill when your 
vehicle may not be seen by other drivers. 
Some towns and cities do not allow 
U-turns. Never make a U-turn at a location 
that is marked with a No U-Turn sign or at 
an intersection controlled by a traffic signal 
or police officer. 

RIGHT TURNS 

On right turns, avoid swinging wide to the left before turning. If you swing 
wide, the driver behind you may think you are changing lanes or going to 
turn left, and may try to pass you on the right. If you swing wide as you 
complete the turn, drivers who are in the far lane will not expect to see you 
there and you could cause an accident. 




LEFT TURNS 

When making a left turn, avoid cutting the 
corner so sharply that you run into someone 
approaching from the left. However, you 
must leave room for oncoming vehicles to 
turn left in front of you. 

ONE-WAY STREET ONTO 
A TWO-WAY STREET 

Begin the turn in the left lane. Enter the 
two-way road to the right of its yellow 
dividing line. If the two-way road is a four- 
lane road, you may enter it in the right lane if 
that lane is free of traffic. 

TWO-WAY STREET ONTO 
A ONE-WAY STREET 

Begin the turn with your left wheel as close 
as possible to the yellow dividing line. If the 
one-way road has two lanes, turn into its left 
lane or right lane, whichever is free of traffic. 



LEFT TURN 


one-way orio (wo-way 








i 








f 




A" 


















t ' 

' s 











LEFT 
TURN 

TWO-WAY 

ONTO 
ONE-WAY 



A" 

□ d 



46 



TWO-WAY STREET ONTO 
A TWO-WAY STREET 

Begin the turn with your left wheels 
as close as possible to the yellow 
dividing line. Enter the road to the 
right of its center line. If the road 
onto which you are turning is a 
four-lane road, you may enter it in 
the right lane if the right lane is 
free of traffic. 



LEFT 
TURN 

TOO-WAY 

ONTO 
TWO-WAY 




MULTIPLE LEFT-TURN 
LANES 

Some streets may have more 
than one lane marked for left 
turns. If you are turning from 
the left side, left-turn lane, enter 
the left lane on the right of the 
yellow dividing line. If you 
are turning from the right side, 
left-turn lane, enter the right 
lane. 



ma-- 

3 B C3 S 

ma*-- 




r 



TWO-WAY LEFT-TURN LANES 

Some streets have a center lane marked as a two-way left-turn lane. Only 
enter this lane when preparing to slow down or stop before making a left 
turn from the main roadway. Do not use this lane as travel lane (a vehicle 
may not travel in this lane for more than 500 feet), and do not use this lane 
when entering the roadway from a side street. 

I III I ^1 I 



inrnr 



47 



ROUNDABOUT 
INTERSECTIONS 

At a roundabout, drivers who approach 
the intersection make a slight right 
turn to go counterclockwise around a 
circular center island. The driver may 
then either exit the roundabout onto a 
different roadway, or continue on the 
same roadway. When approaching a 
roundabout, always yield to traffic in the 
circle and pedestrians in the crosswalks. 



LOCAL ORDINANCES 

Local governments may make traffic ordinances in addition to laws made 
by the state. You must obey any traffic sign or regulation whether set by a 
municipality, county, or the state. Cities and towns may have regulations to 
do the following: 

• Set speed limits 

• Set one-way streets 

• Set stop signs at intersections 

• Prohibit commercial vehicles from using certain streets 

• Control parking by installing meters or by some other reasonable method 

• Control turns 

• Require the use of turn signals, brake lights, and horns on all motor 
vehicles 

• Prohibit the use of sound-producing warning devices 




ALWAYS USE YOUR TURN 
SIGNALS BEFORE TURNING 
OR CHANGING LANES! 



48 



CHAPTER 5 — PARKING 



Drivers are responsible for mal<ing sure tlieir veliicles do not become 
hazards after they have been parl<ed. Whenever you parl< your vehicle, 
be sure it is in a place that is far enough from any travel lane to avoid 
interfering with traffic and visible to vehicles approaching from either 
direction. 

• Always park in a designated area if possible. 

• On one-way streets, you may normally park on either the right or left side 
of the street. 

• Always set your parking brake when you park. Leave the vehicle in 
gear if it has a manual transmission, or in park if it has an automatic 
transmission. 

• Check traffic before you open the door. Get out of the vehicle on the 
curb side if you can. If you have to use the street side, check traffic 
before you get out. Always have passengers, especially children, exit 
the vehicle on the curb side. Check for bicyclists, who often travel on the 
right-hand side of the travel lanes, near parked cars. Shut the door as 
soon as you can after getting out. 

• Never leave the keys in a parked vehicle. Lock the doors whenever you 
leave your vehicle if it will be out of your sight at any time. 

• If you must park on a roadway, park your vehicle as far away from traffic 
as possible. If there is a curb, park as close to it as you can. 

• When you park on a hill, turn your wheels sharply towards the side of the 
road. This way, if your vehicle starts to roll downhill, it will roll away from 
traffic (refer to Parking On Hills). 

NO-PARKING ZONES 

There are many areas where you cannot park. Check for signs that may 
prohibit or limit parking. Some parking restrictions are indicated by colored 
curb markings. Do not park: 

• In an intersection. 

• On a crosswalk or sidewalk. 

• Across a driveway entrance. 

• On the left side of a two-way street. 

• Alongside a curb that is painted yellow. 

• On a bridge. 

• Blocking a fire hydrant. 

• Blocking the normal traffic flow or creating a hazard to other drivers. 

• With your vehicle facing against traffic. 

WHEN CAN YOU PARK IN HANDICAPPED PARKING SPACES? 

Handicapped parking spaces may only be used when the vehicle displays 
a handicapped person placard or license plates, and a physically 
handicapped person is the occupant of the motor vehicle at the time of 
parking, or a physically handicapped person is being dropped off or picked 
up. 



49 




INTERNATIONAL SYMBOL OF ACCESS 

This symbol marks spaces for vehicles operated 
by or used to transport people with handicaps. 
Violators, when convicted, shall be punished by 
a fine of no less than fifty dollars ($50) and no 
more than three hundred dollars ($300). 

The law also provides that: 

• It is illegal to park in handicapped parking access aisles. 

• It is illegal to use a handicapped person's placard or license plates to 
park in designated handicapped parking spaces if the handicapped 
person is not being transported at the time. 

PARKING ON HILLS 

Before leaving your parked vehicle: 

• Turn your wheels in the proper direction (see graphic below); 

• Turn off the motor, leaving the vehicle in proper gear; 

• Set the emergency/parking brake; 

• Remove the keys from the ignition; 

• Check your rearview mirror for traffic before stepping out; and 

• Lock it and pocket the keys. 

Before you drive away from any parking space, be sure to check for traffic 
and signal. 



PARKING ON HILLS 




TURN 
WHEELS 
TO RIGHT 



UP 

HILL 

WITH 
CURB 



TURN 
WHEELS 
TO LEFT 




UP 
HILL 

WITHOUT 
CURB 



TURN 
WHEELS 
TO RIGHT 



50 



PARALLEL PARKING 




1 . Stop even with the vehicle ahead of the parl<ing space about 1 Vi feet to 
the left of that vehicle. 

2. Turn wheels sharply to the right, and back slowly into the parl<ing space. 
Be sure the front of your vehicle does not block passing or oncoming 
traffic. 

3. When clear of the front vehicle, turn wheels sharply to the left and 
continue backing. 

4. Turn wheels sharply to the right and pull forward toward the curb. Park 
in the center of the parking space. 



m A PARKING LOT WITH MARKED 
PARKING SPACES, CENTER YOUR 
VEHICLE SO OTHER DRIVERS 

HAVE ROOM TO ENTER 
AND EXIT THEIR VEHICLES! 



51 



CHAPTER 6 — HIGHWAY DRIVING 



Good driving requires you to be observant and aware of your surroundings. 
You must look down the road, to the sides, and behind your vehicle. Be 
alert for unexpected events. IVIany accidents occur because drivers do not 
pay enough attention to their driving. Do not tal<e your eyes off the road 
for more than a few seconds at any one time. For example, if you need to 
lool< at a map, pull safely off the road. Do not try to read the map while you 
are driving. 

DRIVE IN THE PROPER LANE 

When driving on a highway with a total of two lanes (one lane in each 
direction), drive in the right hand lane. You may cross the center line for 
passing when there are no oncoming vehicles and no solid yellow line. 
On highways with a total of four or more lanes (two or more lanes in each 
direction), always keep to the right unless you are passing slower traffic, 
letting another driver have room to enter safely, or getting ready to make a 
legal left turn. 

CONTROLLING SPEED 

The best way to control your speed is to know how fast you are going. 
Check the speedometer often, and pay attention to the posted speed limits. 
This is especially true when you leave high speed roads and begin driving 
on much slower local roads. For more information on Missouri's speed 
limits, refer to Chapter 3. 

PASSING ON HIGHWAYS 

Use the left lane only to pass another vehicle. You can use the right 
lane when passing a vehicle that is making a left turn. Never use the 
shoulder or unpaved part of the highway to pass. 



Before you pass a vehicle in front 
of you, make sure you are in a safe 
passing zone. On four-lane 
highways, check the left lane for 
traffic by using your left and inside 
rearview mirrors and briefly looking 
over your left shoulder. Looking 
over your left shoulder is important 
because it allows you to check for 
"blind spots." Blind spots are the 
spaces you cannot see with your 
rearview mirrors. Do not drive in 
another vehicle's blind spot. 




• Try to avoid driving on either side and slightly to the rear of another 
vehicle. Either speed up or drop back so the other driver can see your 
vehicle more easily. 



52 



• When passing another vehicle, get through the other driver's blind 
spot as quickly as you can without exceeding the speed limit. The 

longer you stay there, the longer you are in danger of having the vehicle 
collide with your vehicle. 

• Never stay alongside, or immediately behind, a large vehicle such 
as a truck or bus. These vehicles have large blind spots and it is hard 
for their drivers to see you. If you cannot see the truck driver's face in 
the truck's side mirror, the truck driver cannot see you. It takes longer to 
pass a truck. After you pass, make sure you can see the cab of the truck 
in your rearview mirror before reentering the lane. IVIaintain your speed. 
Do not slow down once you are in front of the truck. 

If the way is clear, signal that you are changing lanes. Pass the other 
vehicle quickly and smoothly, being careful not to exceed the speed limit. 

Give plenty of room to the vehicle you just passed. Do not turn back into the 
right lane until you see the passed vehicle in your rearview mirror. Remember to 
look over your right shoulder to check your blind spot, and be sure to signal. 

BEING PASSED 

If another vehicle begins to pass you, stay in your lane and do not increase 
your speed. If many vehicles are passing you in the right lane of a multi- 
lane roadway, you are probably going slower than the rest of the traffic. 
Unless you will be turning left soon, you should move into the right lane 
when the way is clear. 

ADJUSTING TO TRAFFIC 

Vehicles moving in the same direction and lane, and at the same speed 
cannot hit one another. Accidents involving two or more vehicles often 
happen when drivers go faster or slower than other vehicles on the road. 

If you are going faster than traffic, you will have to keep passing others. 
Each time you pass someone, there is a chance for a collision. The vehicle 
you are passing may change lanes suddenly, or on a two-lane road, an 
oncoming vehicle may appear suddenly. Slow down, and keep pace with 
other traffic. Speeding does not save more than a few minutes an hour. 

Going much slower than other vehicles can be just as bad as speeding. 
It tends to make vehicles bunch up behind you and drivers then become 
impatient and pass you. If vehicles are piled up behind you, pull over and 
let them pass when it is safe to do so. 

BE AWARE OF THE TRAFFIC AROUND YOU 

Check your rearview mirrors every few seconds to keep track of the 
approaching traffic. Make sure other drivers see you. Be sure to keep a safe 
distance (refer to Chapter 8) between you and the vehicle in front of you. 

SLOW MOVING TRAFFIC 

Some vehicles cannot travel very fast, or have trouble keeping up with the 
speed of traffic. If you spot these vehicles early, you have time to change 
lanes or slow down safely. Slowing suddenly can cause a traffic accident. 



53 



• Watch for large trucks and small, underpowered vehicles on steep 
grades or when they are entering traffic. They can lose speed on long 
or steep hills and it may take longer for these vehicles to get up to speed 
when they enter traffic. 

STOPPING 

Never stop on the highway itself. Many highways have rest stops and 
service areas. 

Be alert so that you know well ahead of time when you will have to stop. 
Stopping suddenly is dangerous. Braking quickly could cause you to lose 
control of your vehicle. You also make it harder for drivers behind you to 
stop without hitting you. Try to avoid panic stops by seeing events well in 
advance. By slowing down or changing lanes, you may not have to stop at 
all, and if you do, it can be a more gradual and safer stop. 

You can stop on the shoulder of the highway in an emergency. If you do, 
alert other drivers by turning on your emergency flashers. It is also helpful 
to raise the hood, or tie a white cloth to the antenna. 

CONTROLLED ACCESS HIGHWAYS 

Many highways have controlled access. This means you can enter or 
leave the highway only where there are entrance or exit ramps. 

ENTERING THE HIGHWAY 

Entrance ramps are short, one-way ramps used to get on the highway. At 
the end of most entrance ramps is an acceleration lane. Use the ramp and 
acceleration lane to increase your speed to match the speed of the vehicles 
on the highway. 




As you are speeding up, watch for an opening in the highway traffic. 
Switch on your turn signal, and pull smoothly into the traffic. DO NOT stop 
at the end of an acceleration lane unless traffic is very heavy and you have 
to stop. 

Drivers already on the highway should give you room to enter, but if they 
don't, DO NOT force your way onto the highway. You must yield the right- 
of-way to them, even if that means stopping at the end of an acceleration 
lane. 



54 



LEAVING THE HIGHWAY 

Exit ramps are short, one-way ramps. At the beginning of most exit ramps 
is a deceleration lane. IVIake sure you are in the proper lane to leave the 
highway well in advance of the deceleration lane. 




Use the deceleration lane and the exit ramp to slow down when leaving the 
highway. Be sure you obey the speed advisory sign on the exit ramp. Be 
ready to stop or yield at the end of the ramp. 

If you miss your exit, DO NOT stop, back up, or try to turn around on the 
highway. You will have to get off the highway at the next exit and come 
back to the exit you missed. 

INTERCHANGES 

Where two busy highways meet, there may be interchanges instead of 
entrance and exit ramps. An interchange can be confusing if you have not 
driven on it before. There are directional signs on interchanges that can 
help you determine where you need to go. 

SOME COMMON INTERCHANGE DESIGNS: 



Cloverleaf 



Diamond 





Trumpet 



WATCH OUT FOR "HIGHWAY HYPNOSIS" 

Highway hypnosis can make you feel sleepy and unaware of the traffic 
around you. Highway hypnosis is caused by the sameness of the road and 
traffic. The hum of the wind, tires, and engine also adds to the hypnosis. 



55 



You can avoid highway hypnosis by constantly moving your eyes and 
watching the traffic and highway signs around you. If you feel sleepy, pull 
off the highway. Do not risk falling asleep at the wheel. 

STOP DRIVING WHEN YOU FEEL SLEEPY 

When you feel tired, it is harder to make decisions and to react to the traffic 
around you. You may fall asleep at the wheel. When you feel sleepy, pull 
off the highway at the nearest rest stop or service area. If you are really 
sleepy, take a nap. Tired drivers are a great danger to themselves, other 
drivers, and can be as dangerous as intoxicated drivers. 

EMERGENCIES 

If your vehicle breaks down on a highway, make sure other drivers can 
see you and your vehicle. Accidents occur because a driver did not see a 
stalled vehicle until it was too late to stop. 

If possible, use a 2-way radio, telephone, or cellular phone to notify 
authorities that your vehicle (or someone else's) has broken down. IVIany 
roadways have signs that tell you the CB channel or telephone number to 
call in an emergency. The cellular number to call in an emergency is *55. 
If you are having vehicle trouble and have to stop, consider the following: 

• If at all possible, get your vehicle off the road and away from traffic. 

• Turn on your emergency flashers to show you are having trouble. 

• If you cannot get your vehicle off the roadway, try to stop where other 
drivers have a clear view of your vehicle. Do not stop just over a hill or 
just around a curve. 

• Try to warn other drivers that your vehicle is there. Place emergency 
flares behind the vehicle. This alerts other drivers to change lanes if 
necessary. 

• Never stand in the roadway. Do not try to change a tire if it means 
you have to be in a traffic lane. Lift the hood or tie a white cloth to the 
antenna, side mirror, or door handle to signal an emergency. 



IF YOUR VEHICLE BREAKS DOWN 
ON THE ROADSIDE, STAY INSIDE. 
YOU ARE SAFER INSIDE YOUR 
VEHICLE THAN OUTSIDE, 



56 



CHAPTER 7 — SHARING THE ROAD 



SHARING THE ROAD WITH MOTORCYCLES 

Some things you should know when sharing the road with motorcycles: 

• Motorcycles are often overlool<ed by motorists. 

• It is not always easy to judge the speed or distance of a motorcycle. 

• On residential streets, especially those with parl<ed cars, travel at or 
below the speed limit, depending on sight distance. 

• Motorcyclists change speed and lane position when encountering bad 
road conditions, such as manhole covers, diagonal railroad tracl<s, road 
debris, or in strong winds. Be ready to react. 

• You should not share a lane with a motorcycle. The motorcyclist needs 
the entire lane for safety reasons. 

• When you are passing, give motorcycles a full lane width. Do not 
squeeze past these road users. Wait for a clear stretch of road before 
passing a cyclist in a lane too narrow to share. 

SAFETY TIPS FOR MOTORCYCLE RIDERS 

1 . The law requires you to wear a helmet. Wearing a safety-certified 
helmet can prevent serious head injuries or death. 

2. Be sure your motorcycle is in safe condition and has all the equipment 
required by law. 

3. Make sure motorists see you. Wear bright colored clothes and stay out 
of a vehicle's blind spots. Use proper lights and reflectors when riding 
after dark. 

4. Make sure you signal before you slow down, change lanes or turn. 
Before merging, changing lanes, or turning, scan behind and in front 
to ensure that it is safe to make this maneuver. Do so in plenty of 
time and in cooperation with other drivers who will be affected by 
your move. If it is not safe, continue on a straight course and scan 
repeatedly. Only move once it is safe. 

5. Be careful when passing to the left of a parked or moving vehicle. You 
should leave 3 to 4 feet of clearance to avoid suddenly opened car 
doors or to allow for a vehicle to swerve. 

6. Be extra careful at intersections. Do not assume your right-of-way 
when there is a vehicle approaching. Be aware that motor vehicle 
drivers may not see you approaching the intersection, or may believe 
that you are moving at a slower speed than you are. 

7. Keep a steady line and be predictable as a courtesy to other traffic and 
to increase your personal safety. 

MOTORCYCLE DRIVERS NEED A DRIVER LICENSE 

To drive any motorcycle on the public streets, you must have a valid driver 
license with a motorcycle endorsement or a motorcycle license. 



57 



SHARING THE ROAD WITH LARGE TRUCKS 



Trucks are not large cars. Whether they are accelerating, braking, climbing 
a hill, switching lanes, or turning onto a side street, tractor-trailer trucks 
must perform certain maneuvers that drivers of automobiles do not. 

A typical tractor-trailer combination, a power unit pulling a loaded semi- 
trailer hinged to its rear end, may weigh up to 80,000 pounds. Depending 
on the trailer length, the total length of the combination may exceed 90 feet. 
On the busiest intercity routes, a motorist may encounter double or even 
triple-trailer combinations sometimes exceeding 100 feet in length. 

Any motorist who has driven behind one of these trucks at a traffic light 
knows that a semi-trailer combination accelerates slowly. The truck may 
have to go through ten gears to reach the speed limit. The truck may have 
two or three times more power under the hood than a car does, but with up 
to 70,000 pounds of trailer and cargo behind it, a truck engine must move 30 
or 40 times more weight than a car engine. (Published with permission from 
John Deere Transportation Services, Sharing the Road, Deere & Co., 1996.) 
To improve safety for all road users, please consider this information. 

1 . Do not enter a roadway in front of a large vehicle. Avoid changing 
lanes in front of a large vehicle if you are turning off the roadway. 

2. If you are driving behind a truck or a bus and cannot see the driver in 
his or her rearview mirrors, the driver of that vehicle cannot see you. 

3. A truck or bus has blind spots on each side, in the rear and in the front 
where an automobile cannot be seen. These blind spots are referred 
to as the "No-Zone." Do not drive in the No-Zone except when 
absolutely necessary. You should not drive alongside large vehicles 
for prolonged periods at any time. Tailgating a truck is also dangerous. 
Leave any large vehicle a cushion of safety. 




4. It takes longer to pass a truck. After you pass, make sure you can see 
the cab of the truck in your rearview mirror before reentering the lane. 
Maintain your speed and signal when reentering the lane. Do not slow 
down once you are in front of the truck. 

5. When traveling up or down steep grades, large vehicles must drive 
slowly in the right lane. Avoid driving your car in the right lane going up 
or down hills on divided or multi-lane roadways when interacting with 
large trucks. When you are near truck weigh stations, avoid driving in 
the right lane so slow-moving trucks can easily merge back onto the 
roadway. 

58 



6. Vehicles carrying hazardous materials must stop at all railroad 
crossings. Be prepared. 

7. Because of their size, large trucl<s may swing out to the left as the first 
step in mai<ing a right turn. When following a tractor-trailer, observe its 
turn signals before trying to pass. 

8. Tractor-trailers take longer to stop than cars traveling at the same speed. 
The average passenger car traveling at 55 mph can stop in about ISO- 
MO feet, almost half the length of a football field. A fully loaded tractor- 
trailer may take almost 400 feet to come to a complete stop. 

9. Cutting off a truck in traffic or on the highway is particularly dangerous. 
If you need to make a turn or lane change, take a moment to slow 
down and turn behind the truck — it will only take you a few extra 
seconds. 

10. Never underestimate the size and speed of an approaching tractor- 
trailer. Because of its large size, a tractor-trailer often appears to be 
traveling more slowly than its actual speed. Car-truck collisions can 
occur at intersections when the driver of the car does not realize how 
close the truck is or how quickly it is approaching. 

SHARING THE ROAD WITH PEDESTRIANS 

As soon as you step out of your vehicle, you become a pedestrian. As 
a pedestrian, you should know your rights and responsibilities, and as a 
driver you should know the law when pedestrians are around. 

AS A PEDESTRIAN, YOU SHOULD KNOW . . . 

When you are facing a "WALK" signal or a 
green light, you have the right-of-way. You 
may begin to cross the road after you 
make sure all drivers see you and stop for you. 

Do not begin to cross the street when you are 
facing a "DON'T WALK" signal or a red or yellow light. 
If the flashing "DON'T WALK" sign appears 
when you are crossing the street, you may finish 
crossing the street. 

You should cross the road at an intersection 
or a crosswalk when: 

• You are in a business district. 

• You are between two closely spaced intersections with traffic lights. 

Otherwise, you may cross the road in the middle of the block without a 
crosswalk being careful when stepping out between two parked vehicles. 
You must yield the right-of-way to all traffic when crossing in the middle of 
a block. Walk facing traffic when no sidewalk is available. 

You should not stand in a traffic lane to speak to a driver for any length 
of time, as this could cause an accident. Instead, you should wait for the 
driver to pull over to a safe parking spot, and you should remain on the 
curb side of the vehicle. 





59 



AS A DRIVER, YOU SHOULD KNOW . . . 

In some situations, pedestrians are required by law to yield to vehicles. 
In other situations, vehicles are required to yield to pedestrians. In all 
situations, whether the pedestrians are obeying the law or not, you must 
drive carefully, reduce your speed if needed, and do your best to avoid 
endangering pedestrians. 

Even when you are facing a green light you must yield the right-of-way to 
all pedestrians in the intersection. Never assume you have the right-of- 
way. Do not assume pedestrians see you and will stop for you. 

Do not pass a vehicle that has stopped or slowed down for a pedestrian. 

Watch out for kids. Children will run out into the road without looking for 
traffic. So, be extra careful when you drive near schools, playgrounds, 
parks, or in residential areas. You must obey a slower speed limit in a 
school zone when lights are flashing or children are present. At a school 
crossing where there is a traffic patrol, stop and yield if a traffic patrol 
member signals you to do so. 

The following laws or rules also apply: 

• Drivers must always yield the right-of-way to persons who are blind. 
When a pedestrian is crossing a street or highway guided by a dog or 
carrying a white cane (or a white cane with a red tip), vehicles must 
come to a complete stop. 

• Drivers must yield when a pedestrian is in a marked or unmarked 
crosswalk on or approaching their side of the road. 

• As you prepare for a right turn, especially on a red traffic signal, be 
cautious of pedestrians (or bicyclists) approaching on your right. 

• Drivers should not block the crosswalk when stopped at a red traffic 
signal. Drivers should not cross a sidewalk or crosswalk without first 
yielding to pedestrians. 

SHARING THE ROAD WITH MOPEDS AND BICYCLES 

Some things you should know when sharing the road with mopeds or 
bicycles: 

• Most collisions with bicycles and mopeds happen at intersections, where 
smaller, slower bicycles and mopeds are especially easy to overlook. 
Scan carefully for bicycles and mopeds before proceeding through an 
intersection, giving them the same consideration you would any other 
vehicle. 

• Bicycles are often overlooked by motorists. 

• It is not always easy to judge the speed or distance of a bicycle. 

• Accidents with wrong-way bicyclists frequently occur when a motorist 
wants to turn right onto a main road and is only looking left for 
approaching traffic. Be sure to look right and check for wrong-way 
bicyclists on the road or sidewalk before proceeding. 

• On residential streets, especially those with parked cars, travel at or 
below the speed limit. 



60 



• If you are following a bicyclist and need to make a right turn, slow down 
and remain behind the cyclist until you are able to turn. 

• Cyclists often travel at surprisingly fast speeds. If you need to make a 
left turn, yield to oncoming bicyclists unless you are absolutely sure you 
can make the turn before the cyclist reaches the intersection. 

• Bicyclists change speed and lane position when encountering bad road 
conditions, such as manhole covers, diagonal railroad tracks, drain 
grates, road debris, or in strong winds. Be ready to react. 

• When you are passing, give bicycles and mopeds a full lane width. Do 
not squeeze past these road users. The bicycle is generally a slower 
moving vehicle and this may require you to slow down. Wait for a clear 
stretch of road before passing a cyclist in a lane too narrow to share. 

• Check for passing bicyclists before opening your car door into a traffic 
lane or bicycle lane. 

• A bicycle lane is a portion of a roadway designated by striping to be used 
by bicycles. You may cross a bicycle lane when turning or when entering 
or leaving the roadway. You must yield to bicyclists in a bicycle lane. 

WHERE TO RIDE MOPEDS AND BICYCLES 

On public streets and highways, you have the same rights and responsibilities 
as a motor vehicle operator. Always ride with traffic, never against it. 
When operating at less than the posted speed or traffic flow, generally ride 
as near to the right side of the roadway as is safe. The right edge of the 
road often has hazards like ditches, gutters, sand, and gravel shoulders. 
Leave space between yourself and these hazards as needed for safety. 

You may move more toward the middle or left of the lane or roadway, as 
appropriate: 

• when making a left turn; 

• when avoiding hazards; 

• when the lane is too narrow to share with another vehicle; and 

• when there is a right-turn-only lane and you are going straight. 
Always check traffic and signal before changing lanes or changing your 
position within a lane. On a one-way street, bicyclists may also choose to 
ride as far left as is safe. 

The law does not allow you to ride a moped on any part of the federal 
interstate highway system. 

SAFETY TIPS FOR MOPED AND BICYCLE RIDERS 

1 . State law does not require you to wear a helmet. However, wearing a 
safety-certified helmet can prevent serious head injuries or death. 

2. Be sure your bike is in safe condition and has all the equipment 
required by law. 

3. Make sure motorists see you. Wear bright colored clothes and stay out 
of a vehicle's blind spots. Use proper lights and reflectors when riding 
after dark. 



61 



4. Make sure you signal before you slow down, change lanes, or turn. 
Before merging, changing lanes, or turning, scan behind and in front 
to ensure that it is safe to make this maneuver. Do so in plenty of 
time and in cooperation with other drivers who will be affected by 
your move. If it is not safe, continue on a straight course and scan 
repeatedly and only move once it is safe. In conditions of heavy traffic, 
less proficient bicyclists may find it easier to wait near the curb for a 
safe gap to appear. 

5. Be careful when passing to the left of a parked or moving vehicle. You 
should leave 3 to 4 feet of clearance to avoid suddenly opened car 
doors or to allow for a vehicle to swerve. 

6. Be extra careful at intersections. Do not assume your right-of-way 
when there is a vehicle approaching. Be aware that motor vehicle 
drivers may not see you approaching the intersection, or may believe 
that you are moving at a slower speed than you are. 

7. Keep a steady line and be predictable as a courtesy to other traffic and 
to increase your personal safety. 

8. For teen and adult bicyclists, studies show that riding on the street with 
traffic, not against it (following the same traffic rules that other vehicles 
do), is far safer than riding on the sidewalk. 

MOPED DRIVERS NEED A DRIVER LICENSE 

To drive any motorized bicycle such as a moped on the public streets, you 
must have a valid driver license. A motorized bicycle is defined as any two- 
wheeled or three-wheeled device having an automatic transmission and 
a motor with a cylinder capacity of not more than fifty cubic centimeters, 
which produces less than three gross brake horsepower, and is capable of 
propelling the device at a maximum speed of not more than thirty miles per 
hour on level ground. 

EQUIPMENT REQUIRED ON MOPEDS AND BICYCLES 

You do not have to register your moped or bicycle and it does not have 
to be inspected. However, Missouri law requires certain equipment on 
mopeds and bicycles. 

BRAKES — Your brakes must be able to stop you within 25 feet when 
traveling 10 mph. 

LIGHTS AND REFLECTORS — The number of bicycle-auto crashes rises 
dramatically between sunset and sunrise. Almost all such crashes can 
be prevented with proper bicycle lights and reflectors. You must have the 
following lights and reflectors when riding your bicycle from 16 hour after 
sunset until 14 hour before sunrise: 

1 . A WHITE LIGHT on the front of your bicycle or carried by you that 
other drivers can see from 500 feet. 

2. A REAR RED REFLECTOR, at least two square inches, or a REAR 
RED LIGHT that drivers can see when reflected by their vehicles' low 
beam headlights at 600 feet. 



62 



3. REFLECTIVE MATERIAL OR LIGHTS on the pedals, crank arms, 
shoes, or lower legs that drivers can see when reflected by their 
vehicles' low beam headlights at 200 feet. 

4. REFLECTIVE MATERIAL AND/OR LIGHTS ON EACH SIDE OF 
THE BICYCLE or bicyclist that drivers can see when reflected by 
their vehicles' low beam headlights at 300 feet. This does not apply 
to mopeds that comply with the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration Regulations. 

FUNERAL PROCESSIONS 

If you are driving a vehicle in a funeral procession, you should follow the 
vehicle in front of you as closely as is practical and safe. Every vehicle 
in the procession must use its flashing emergency lights. An organized 
funeral procession has the right-of-way at all intersections regardless of 
any traffic control device, except for emergency vehicles or when directed 
otherwise by law enforcement officials. 

The following rules apply to all drivers not involved in an organized funeral 
procession. 

1 . Do not drive between the vehicles that are part of the procession when 
they are in motion. 

2. Do not join a funeral procession for the purpose of obtaining the right- 
of-way. 

3. Do not attempt to pass any vehicle in the procession except where a 
passing lane has been specifically provided. 

4. Do not enter an intersection in which a procession is going through a 
red signal light, unless you may do so without crossing the path of the 
funeral procession. 

ROAD RAGE 

Road rage is an uncontrolled display of anger by the operator of a motor 
vehicle (usually in response to another driver's actions), which can result in 
property damage or personal injury. 

Drivers prone to road rage are usually aggressive individuals who fail to 
follow courteous driving practices. Some examples of behavior associated 
with road rage include: 

-Beeping the horn -Pursuing another vehicle 

-Flashing the headlights -Making aggressive gestures 

-Forcing another vehicle to pull over -Verbally abusing another driver 
-Bumping into another vehicle -Tailgating another vehicle 

-Threatening another driver -Braking or slowing suddenly 

-Damaging a vehicle intentionally -Deliberate obstruction 
-Assaulting another driver -"Cutting off" or swerving 

As our society has become more accustomed to it, road rage has become 
a "normal" part of our driving environment. These habits can be unlearned, 
but it takes self discipline on the part of drivers. 



63 



When confronted with any of the behaviors associated with road rage, 
you should try to . . . 

• Remain calm and do not react with similar behavior. 

• Identify the location (for example: intersection, mile marker, direction the 
vehicle was traveling, etc.). 

• Get a physical description of the driver. 

• Get a description of the vehicle (approximate year, make, model, color, 
license plate number, etc.). 

• Report the incident to the nearest local authorities as soon as possible. 

• If you have a cellular phone, exit the roadway to a safe area and dial *55 
(or 91 1 if you are in a metropolitan area). 

DRUNK DRIVERS 

If you believe you have seen a drunk driver, tell the police immediately. 
You may be saving someone's life. Helpful information to provide the 
officer includes the license plate number of the vehicle, a physical 
description of the car and driver, and the vehicle's location. 

ABOUT LITTERING 

Littering is against the law. It is unsightly and 
may cause a traffic accident. For example, a lit 
cigarette thrown out a car window can be blown 
into the vehicle behind you, causing property 
damage or personal injury. 

If a judge finds you guilty of littering, you may have 
to pay up to a $1 ,000 fine and/or spend up to one year in jail. 



NolSfeRE 

TrasH! 



SHARING THE ROAD WITH OTHERS, 
IN A CONSIDERATE MANNER, 
MAKES THE ROAD SAFER 
FOR EVERYBODY! 



64 



CHAPTER 8 — SAFE DRIVING TIPS 
FOR EVERYDAY DRIVING 



USE SEAT BELTS AND CHILD RESTRAINTS 

Before you drive, always fasten your seat belt(s) and make sure all your 
passengers are using seat belts or child restraints. Studies have shown 
that if you use seat belts, your chances of being hurt or killed in an accident 
are greatly reduced. 

Seat belts should always be worn with the lap belt low and snug across the 
hips and the shoulder belt across the chest. Shoulder belts should never 
be placed under the arm or behind the back. If your vehicle has a two-part 
seat belt system, be sure to wear both the lap and shoulder belt. 

Seat belts should be worn even if your vehicle is equipped with air 
bags. While air bags are good protection against hitting the steering 
wheel, dashboard, or windshield, they do not protect you if you are hit from 
the side or rear, or if the vehicle rolls over. An air bag will not keep you 
behind the wheel in these situations. 

An unrestrained or improperly restrained occupant can be seriously injured 
or killed by a deploying air bag. The National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration recommends drivers sit with at least 10 inches between the 
center of their breastbone and the center of the steering wheel. Children 
12 and under should always ride properly restrained in a rear seat. Never 
put a rear-facing infant restraint in the front seat of a vehicle with a front 
passenger air bag. 

If you need more information about child seat safety, contact: Department 
of Transportation, Highway Safety Division, web site: www.modot.gov; 
phone: (800) 800-BELT. 

SEAT BELTS — IT'S THE LAW 

Missouri law requires the operator and front seat 
occupants of all passenger vehicles to wear a 
properly adjusted and fastened seat belt. However, 
ALL passengers accompanying an intermediate 
driver license holder must be properly restrained. 

CHILD PASSENGER RESTRAINT LAW 

The law requires children of certain ages, weights 
and heights to be restrained by a child passenger 
restraint system, booster seat or safety belt when 
transported in any motor vehicle other than a public 
carrier for hire or school bus. 

AGE, WEIGHT AND HEIGHT CLASSIFICATIONS 

• LESS THAN 4 YEARS OLD — Children less than four years old, 
regardless of weight, shall be secured in a child passenger restraint 
system appropriate for that child. 




65 



• LESS THAN 40 POUNDS — Children weighing less than 40 pounds, 
regardless of age, shall be secured in a child passenger restraint system 
appropriate for that child. 

• LESS THAN 8 YEARS OLD or 80 POUNDS OR UNDER 4'9 " — 

Children at least four years of age but less than eight years of age, who 
also weigh at least 40 pounds but less than 80 pounds, and are also less 
than 4'9" tall shall be secured in a child passenger restraint system or 
booster seat appropriate for that child. 

• CHILDREN AT LEAST 8 YEARS OLD, GREATER THAN 80 POUNDS 
OR TALLER THAN 4'9" — Children at least 8 years old, at least 80 
pounds or children more than 4'9" tall shall be secured by a vehicle 
safety belt or booster seat appropriate for that child. 

For more information on the Booster Seat Law refer to the Department of 
Transportation web site: www.modot.org/boosterseats/. 

DEFENSIVE DRIVING 

To avoid mal<ing mistal<es, or being in an accident because of someone 
else's mistake, you must drive defensively. As a defensive driver you should: 

• Keep your eyes moving. Notice what is happening ahead of you and on 
the sides of the road, and check behind you through your mirrors every 
few seconds. Pay special attention to oncoming vehicles. Many head- 
on collisions occur by distracted drivers crossing the centerline. 

• Expect other drivers to make mistakes, and think what you would do 

if a mistake does happen. For example, do not assume that a vehicle 
coming to a stop sign is going to stop. Be ready to react if it does not 
stop. Never cause an accident on purpose, even if a pedestrian or 
another vehicle fails to give you the right-of-way. 

• Do not rely on traffic signals or signs to keep others from crossing in 
front of you. Some drivers may not obey traffic signals or signs. At an 
intersection, look to the left and right, even if other traffic has a red light 
or a stop sign. 

PROPER POSTURE WHILE DRIVING 

The way you sit and hold the steering wheel affects your driving. Good 
posture can help you stay alert and in full control of your vehicle. 

• Sit with your back straight, upright, and relaxed against the seat. 

• Move your seat close enough so you can easily reach the pedals but 
far enough away that your elbows are in front of you when you hold the 
steering wheel. 

• Keep both feet within reach of the floor controls. 

• Keep both hands on the steering wheel. 

STEERING 

Use a proper grip. Place your left hand between the 7 & 9 o'clock positions 
and your right hand between the 3 & 5 o'clock positions on the steering 
wheel. This position is comfortable and allows you to make most turns 
without taking your hands off the wheel. 



66 



Look well down the road, not just at the road in front of your vehicle. Look 
for traffic situations where you will need to steer or slow before you get to 
them. 

When turning corners, turn the steering wheel using the hand-over-hand 
technique. Do not turn the wheel with just the palm of one hand, because 
you could lose control. When you complete a turn, straighten out the 
steering wheel by hand. 

Steering Wheel Locking Device — Never turn your vehicle's ignition key 
to the "lock" position while your vehicle is still in motion. This will cause the 
steering wheel to lock if you try to turn the steering wheel, and you will lose 
control of your vehicle. 

FOLLOWING OTHER VEHICLES 

Be sure to keep a safe distance between your vehicle and the vehicle in front 
of you. You need a safe distance to stop or turn to avoid an accident. Rear- 
end crashes are very common. They are caused by drivers who follow too 
closely and cannot stop in time when the vehicle ahead suddenly stops. 

THREE SECOND RULE 

A good way to measure your safe following distance is to use the "three 
second rule." Choose an object near the road ahead, like a sign or 
telephone pole. As the vehicle ahead of you passes it, count slowly, "One 
thousand one, one thousand two, one thousand three." If you reach the 
object before you finish counting, you are too close to the vehicle ahead. 

SPACE BEHIND 

It is not always easy to maintain a safe distance behind your vehicle. 
However, you can help keep the driver at a safe distance by keeping a 
steady speed, and signaling in advance when you slow down. Follow these 
safety tips: 

• Try to find a safe place out of traffic to stop and pick up or let off 
passengers. 

• If you want to parallel park and there is traffic coming behind you, put on 
your turn signal, pull next to the space, and allow vehicles to pass before 
you park. 

• When you have to drive so slowly that you slow down other vehicles, pull 
to the side of the road when it is safe to do so, and let them pass. There 
are turnout areas on some two-lane roads you could use. Other two- 
lane roads sometimes have passing lanes. 

• If you are followed too closely or "tailgated" by another driver, and there 
is a right lane, move over to the right. If there is no right lane, wait until 
the road ahead is clear and then reduce speed slowly. This will encourage 
the tailgater to drive around you. Never slow down quickly to discourage 
a tailgater. This will only increase your risk of being hit from behind. 

SPACE TO THE SIDE 

You need space on both sides of your vehicle to have room to turn or 
change lanes. 



67 



• Avoid driving next to other veiiicles on multi-lane roads. Someone may 
crowd your lane or try to change lanes and pull into you. Move ahead or 
drop behind the other vehicle. 

• Keep as much space as you can between yourself and oncoming 
vehicles. On a two-lane road, this means not crowding the center line. 
In general, it is safest to drive in the center of your lane. 

• Make room for vehicles entering on a multi-lane roadway. If there is not 
a vehicle in the lane next to you, move over a lane. 

• Keep extra space between your vehicle and parked vehicles. Someone 
could step out from a parked vehicle, from between vehicles, or a parked 
vehicle could pull out. 

• Give extra space to pedestrians or bicyclists, especially children. They 
may move into your path quickly and without warning. Wait until it is 
safe to pass. 

• When possible, take potential hazards one at a time. For example, if 
you are overtaking a bicycle and an oncoming vehicle is approaching, 
slow down and let the vehicle pass first so you can give extra room to 
the bicycle. 

STOPPING DISTANCE 

Your stopping distance equals your reaction distance plus your braking 
distance. If you are driving fast, are very tired, or if your vehicle has bad 
brakes, you will need more space to stop your vehicle. 

The foilowing distance equals your reaction distance plus your vehicle's 
braking distance at different speeds. The reaction distance is the distance 
you travel after you see a danger and before you apply your brakes. In the 
chart shown below, the reaction distance is for 1 .5 seconds. You have to 
be alert to react within one and one-half seconds. 

The braking distance is the distance you travel after you apply your brakes 
and before your vehicle comes to a stop. In the chart shown below, 
the braking distance is for a vehicle with good brakes and tires, in good 
weather and on a good road. 

AVERAGE STOPPING DISTANCE OF CARS ON DRY LEVEL PAVEMENT 



Speed 
MPH , 





20 



44/18 



30 



66/40 



45 



100/90 



55 



] 121/134 



60 



] 132/160 



65 



] 143/188 



BO 



] 176/284 



0 



100 



200 



300 



400 



500 



FEET 



68 



LETTING OTHERS KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING 

Generally, other drivers expect you to keep doing what you are doing. You 
must warn them when you are going to change direction or slow down. 
This will give them time to react to what you do. 

SIGNAL WHEN YOU CHANGE DIRECTION 

You should use your turn signals before you change lanes, turn right or left, 
merge into traffic, or park. 

• Get into the habit of signaling every time you change direction. Signal 
even when you do not see anyone else around. It is easy to miss 
someone who needs to know what you are doing. 

• Signal as early as you can. Try to signal at least 100 feet before you 
make your move. If there are other streets, driveways, or entrances 
between you and where you want to turn, wait until you have passed 
them to signal. 

• If another vehicle is about to enter the street between you and where 
you plan to turn, wait until you have passed it to signal your turn. 

• After you have made a turn or lane change, make sure your turn signal 
is off. After small turns, the signal may not turn off by itself. Turn it off if 
it has not clicked off by itself. If you do not, other drivers might think you 
plan to turn again. 

USING YOUR HORN 

Do not use your horn unless you have to. Needless use of your horn may 
distract other drivers and cause an accident. There is only one reason to 
use your horn: to warn other drivers. Your horn should not be used as a 
display of anger or frustration. 

"SLOW POKE " DRIVING 

It is against the law for you to drive slower than the posted minimum speed 
under normal driving conditions. You may drive more slowly than the minimum 
speed if you are driving in bad weather, heavy traffic, or on a bad road. 

If there is no posted minimum speed, it is still against the law for you to 
drive so slowly that you block traffic. If you have to drive more slowly, and 
vehicles line up behind you, you should pull over and let them pass. IVIany 
accidents are caused by slow drivers who block other traffic. Remember, 
slower is not always safer. 

CARBON MONOXIDE 

Beware of carbon monoxide poisoning. Vehicle motors give off carbon 
monoxide which is a deadly gas. To avoid carbon monoxide poisoning: 

• Do not leave the motor running in a garage. 

• Do not leave the motor running and windows closed when you park your 
vehicle. 

• Do not use the heater or air conditioner in a parked vehicle with the 
windows closed. 

• Do not leave the vents open when following closely behind another 
vehicle. 

• Do not drive with a defective muffler or exhaust system. 



69 



TIPS FOR AVOIDING A DEER-VEHICLE ACCIDENT (DVA) 

You can reduce your odds of being involved in a deer-veliicle accident 
(DVA) by applying these precautionary measures: 

• Be especially alert and use caution when traveling through areas marked 
with deer crossing signs. 

• Deer seldom travel alone. Chances are if you see one deer crossing a 
road or notice a struck deer on the side of the road, there are others 
nearby. 

• Be especially cautious in areas around fields, streams, and gardens 
where deer tend to congregate. 

• Most deer-related crashes occur in January, May, and October through 
December. 

• Highest-risk periods are from sunset to midnight and the hours shortly 
before and after sunrise. 

• After dark, use high beams when there is no opposing traffic. High 
beams will illuminate the eyes of deer on or near a roadway and provide 
greater motorist reaction time. 

• To reduce the likelihood of serious injury in a DVA, be sure all vehicle 
occupants wear seat belts and children are properly restrained in child 
safety seats. 

• If you see that a DVA is unavoidable, do not swerve. Swerving off the 
road or into the path of an oncoming car can increase the risk of injury. 
Make sure there is no traffic behind you before slowing suddenly. Too 
much brake pressure can cause the front end of the vehicle to drop 
down, striking the deer in the legs and allowing the body to come into 
the passenger compartment of the vehicle. 

• If you are involved in a DVA: 

1 . Report the accident to a local law enforcement agency; 

2. Obtain a police report (if required) to file a claim for coverage with 
your insurance company; and 

3. Contact a local Missouri Department of Conservation agent to report 
where the accident occurred. This can help to identify frequent deer 
crossing areas. 




70 




NIGHT DRIVING 

Driving at night is more difficult than driving during the day. Headlights do 
not let you see as far ahead as you can in daylight, limit your view of the 
sides of the road. The glare of oncoming headlights makes seeing the road 
more difficult. 



For driving at night, you should: 

• Make sure your windows are clean. 

• Turn your headlights on from Vi hour after sunset until V^ hour before sunrise. 

• Make sure your headlights are clean and working well. Have them 
checked from time to time for correct aim. 

• Use your high beams when there are no oncoming vehicles. 

• Do not overdrive your headlights. Your headlights only let you see about 350 
feet ahead. Be sure you are driving slow enough to stop or turn if needed. 

• Use your low beams when you come within 500 feet (about one block) of 
an oncoming vehicle. Also use your low beams when following another 
vehicle within 300 feet. 

• Slow down when nearing a curve if you are driving the maximum posted 
speed limit. 

• Use the edgeline as a guide. If there is no edgeline, use the center line 
to guide you. 

• Stay awake and alert. Do not drive if you feel tired. 

• Watch carefully for highway signs as they are harder to see at night. 

• Watch carefully for people and vehicles stopped on the side of the road. 

HEADLIGHT USE 

You must use your headlights any time weather conditions require the use 
of your windshield wipers. 

WINTER DRIVING 

In winter, clean all snow and ice off your windows, headlights, and taillights. 
Be sure your windshield wipers and defroster are working. No matter how 
far you are going to drive, never start driving until all snow and ice is off 
your windows. 

Your vehicle should have tires that are rated for driving in snow. If you do 
not have tires that are rated for driving in snow, you should have chains 
ready to put on your tires during bad weather. But even if you have "snow" 
tires or chains, you cannot drive safely on snow or ice at normal speeds. If 
there is snow or ice on the road, slow down. 




71 



When starting on snow or ice, start slowly and smoothly. If your tires start 
to spin, try clearing a path by driving bacl<wards and fonwards a few times. 
If that does not help, spread some abrasive material lil<e salt, sand, or cat 
box litter around your wheels. NEVER let anyone stand in line with your 
wheels. Your wheels may throw up gravel or ice and cause an injury. 

Once you have started, try to get the feel of the road. Gently brake while 
driving to see how slippery the road is and then adjust your speed for the 
road conditions. 

It will tal<e longer to stop your vehicle when driving on snow or ice. So be 
sure to leave a safe distance, about 8 to 10 seconds, between your vehicle 
and any vehicle ahead of you. 

When you want to slow down or stop, apply the brakes gently and 
smoothly. Never slam on your brakes — this may cause you to skid. On 
very slippery surfaces, pump the brakes by gently pushing down and letting 
up on them several times. If your vehicle is equipped with an anti-lock 
brake system, refer to your owner's manual for proper braking techniques 
in special situations. 

Remember that bridges and overpasses will freeze and become slippery 
before other parts of the road, and be aware that even on cleared roads a 
few ice patches may still exist. 

If you have a four-wheel drive vehicle, DO NOT use the four-wheel drive on 
ice. Four-wheel drive vehicles can easily overturn on ice. If you hit an icy 
patch in four-wheel drive, take your foot off the accelerator. 

Remember, Ice and Snow. . . . Take it slow! 

WET PAVEMENT 

When it starts to rain, water mixes with the dust and oil on the road to form 
a slick, greasy film. Fallen leaves can also become slippery. The wet 
pavement may make it harder for you to stay on the road on curves. It will 
also take longer to stop your vehicle. So be sure to slow your speed and 
leave a safe distance between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of you. 

HYDROPLANING — On wet pavement, your tires may ride on the water 
rather than the pavement. This is known as "hydroplaning" and it refers to 
loss of traction and control. Hydroplaning can happen at any speed over 
35 mph. In a severe rainstorm, the tires can lose all contact with the road 
at 55 mph. 

If you think your tires are hydroplaning, take your foot off the accelerator 
and slow down. Do not hit the brakes as this may cause you to skid. 
To avoid hydroplaning: 

• Have good tires with deep treads on your vehicle. 

• Keep tires properly inflated. 

• Slow down during rainstorms or when the pavement is wet. 



72 



ANTI-LOCK BRAKING SYSTEM (ABS) 

Four-wheel ABS is a safe, effective bral<ing system wlien used properly. It 
offers an important safety advantage by preventing the wheels from locking 
during emergency braking situations. If your car is equipped with ABS, 
you should be aware that under hard braking you may feel a pulsing in 
the brake pedal. DO KEEP your foot on the brake. Maintain a firm and 
continuous pressure on the brake while steering to enable the four-wheel 
ABS to work properly. Remember, if your vehicle is equipped with anti- 
lock brakes DON'T PUMP YOUR BRAKES, DON'T FORGET TO STEER, 
AND DON'T BE ALARMED BY MECHANICAL NOISES AND/OR SLIGHT 
PEDAL PULSATIONS. These conditions are normal and let you know the 
ABS is working. 

SKIDDING 

Handling a skid is the same for front-wheel and rear-wheel drive vehicles. 
Take your foot off the accelerator, but DO NOT hit the brakes. 

• Gently turn your steering wheel in the direction that your rear wheels are 
sliding. 

• Be careful not to brake or turn sharply. Hitting the brakes or jerking the 
steering wheel will only make the skid worse. 



STEER INTO THE SKID 




BEFORE 
SKID 



2.REAR 
WHEELS 
SLIDE 
TO RIGHT 



3. TURN 
FRONT 
WHEELS 
TO RIGHT 



VEHICLE 

STRAIGHT 

AGAIN 



FOG 

It is very dangerous to drive in fog. If you must drive in fog, you should: 

• Reduce your speed. 

• Be alert and ready to stop. 

• Keep your headlights on low beam. In fog, you will see less if your lights 
are on high beam. 

• If the fog becomes so thick you cannot see, pull off the road and stop. 
Leave your lights and emergency flashers ON. 

HANDLING VEHICLE EMERGENCIES 

The most important rule in any emergency is DO NOT PANIC. If you stay 
calm, you will remember what you should do. If you have power steering 
or a locking steering wheel, never turn off the ignition key until you have 
come to a full stop. 



73 



BRAKE FAILURE: If your brake pedal suddenly sinks to the floor: 

1 . Pump the brake pedal fast and hard several times. If that does not work... 

2. Use your emergency or parking brake, but use it gradually. 

3. Shift to a low gear and look for a place to slow to a stop. 

4. Make sure your vehicle is off the road. 

5. After the vehicle has stopped, call for help. Do not try to drive to a garage. 

TIRE BLOWOUT: If you have a tire blowout, you may hear a loud "bang" 
then "thump, thump, thump." The steering wheel may jerk, and you may 
lose control of your vehicle. 

1 . Hold the steering wheel tightly. 

2. Take your foot off the accelerator, but do not hit the brakes. 

3. Let your vehicle slow to a stop completely off the road. 

4. Apply the brakes when the vehicle is almost stopped. 

5. Turn on your emergency flashers. 

6. Change the tire only if you can do so without placing yourself in danger. 

RUNNING OFF THE PAVEMENT: If your wheels run off the paved edge 
of the road, the wheels may pull to the right: 

1 . Hold the steering wheel tightly. 

2. Take your foot off the accelerator, but do not hit the brakes. Only 
apply gentle brake pressure if necessary. 

3. When the vehicle has slowed and you have control of your vehicle, 
turn back onto the pavement if the lane is free of traffic. 

STEERING FAILURE: If your vehicle does not turn when you turn the wheel: 

1 . Take your foot off the accelerator. 

2. Let your vehicle slow down by itself. Do not hit the brakes until your 
vehicle has almost stopped or unless you have to. 

3. Turn on your emergency flashers. 

HEADLIGHT FAILURE: If your vehicle's headlights go out: 

1 . Try the dimmer switch or headlight switch, that might turn them on 
again. If that does not work... 

2. Put on the parking lights, emergency flashers, or turn signals. 

3. Pull off the road, but leave the emergency flashers on. 

STUCK ACCELERATOR: If your accelerator becomes stuck, you should: 

1. Shift to neutral. 

2. Apply the brakes. 

3. Keep your eyes on the road. 

4. Look for a way out. 

5. Warn other drivers by honking and flashing your emergency lights. 

6. Try to drive the car safely off the road. 

7. When you no longer need to change direction and have stopped, turn 
off the ignition. (Turning off the key locks the steering wheel of many 
vehicles.) 



74 



BLOCKED VISION: If your hood suddenly flies open, your windshield 
wipers fail, or something else blocks your vision: 

1 . Roll down the window so you can look around whatever is blocking 
your view. 

2. Turn on your emergency flashers. 

3. Pull your vehicle off the road. 

VEHICLE APPROACHING HEAD-ON IN YOUR LANE: 

1. Slowdown. 

2. Pull over to the right and sound your horn. 

3. DO NOT swing over into the left lane. The other driver may pull back 
over into that lane too. 

STALLING ON RAILROAD TRACKS: 

If a train is approaching: 

1 . Unfasten your seat belt, get out of your vehicle, and off the tracks. 

2. Run in the direction the train is coming from. (If you run in the 
direction the train is heading, you may be hit with debris when the train 
hits your vehicle.) 

If there is no train in sight: 

1 . Roll down your windows and listen for the train. 

2. Try to start the engine. If that fails... 

3. Put your vehicle in neutral and push it off the tracks. 

12 AND 15 PASSENGER VAN SAFETY: 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has determined that 12- 
and 15-passenger vans are inherently unstable when loaded to the level for 
which they are designed, carrying more than ten passengers. The NTSB 
recommends that all drivers of 12- and 15-passenger vans obtain specific 
training on the handling and operation of these types of vehicles. For more 
information regarding 12- and 15-passenger van safety, you may visit the 
NTSB's web site at www.ntsb.gov. 



IT IS GOOD TO PRACTICE DRIVING 
IN BAD WEATHER, BUT TRY TO FIND 
A SAFE LOCATION AWAY FROM TRAFFIC, 
PEDESTRIANS, AND OTHER OBSTACLES! 



75 



CHAPTER 10 — BE IN SHAPE TO DRIVE 



ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND DRIVING 

Driving a motor veliicle is a privilege. It takes skill and common sense. 
Alcohol or drugs or fatigue will cause your driving to suffer, and it is your 
responsibility to know when you are not in shape to drive. Driving under 
the influence of alcohol or drugs, even medicine, or driving when you're 
tired can have deadly consequences — for you, your passengers, and 
other motorists. 

Drinking and driving is not worth the risk to your life and the lives of others. 
Even a small amount of alcohol may affect your driving ability. If you are 
going to drink, let someone else drive who has not been drinking. 

IVIissouri laws are tough if you are found guilty of drinking or using drugs 
while driving. You may pay a fine, lose your license, and even go to jail. 

If you injure or kill someone because you were drinking or using drugs 
while driving, you may: 

• Spend 2 to 7 years in jail, 

• Pay a $5,000 fine, and/or 

• Lose your driver license for 5 years. 

When a police officer stops you and suspects you have been drinking, 
the officer may ask you to take some tests like walking heel to toe or 
standing on one leg. These tests will help the officer decide if you should 
be arrested and have a chemical test of your breath, blood, or urine. The 
result of this test is known as your Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAG) 
level. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS 

If your Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) level is .08% or more (or for 
minors .02% or more), the officer will take your license away and give 
you a notice. This notice tells you that your license will be suspended or 
revoked (and you will not be able to legally drive) after 15 days. The notice 
includes a 15-day driving permit that you can use if the officer indicates this 
on the notice. The notice also includes a form that allows you to request a 
hearing. If you are given a hearing, you may continue to legally drive until 
15 days after a decision is mailed to you. 

There are two types of actions that may be taken against you for driving 
when you are not fit to drive. There are administrative actions and court 
convicted actions, which carry different penalties. 



76 



The following chart shows the administrative actions that you can expect to 
face if you are arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. 



Administrative 
Action 


Driver License 

Suspension/ 

Revocation/Denial 


To Get Your 
License Back 


License Suspension 


1st Offense -30 dav 


Please see 
page 80 
for 

Reinstatement 


suspension, followed 
by a 60-day restricted 
driving privilege 

*2nd Offense - 30 dav 


suspension, followed 
by a 60-day restricted 
driving privilege, for 
a 2nd offense that 
occurred outside a 
5-year period 


License Revocation 


*2nd Offense -1-Year 


license revocation 



*lgnition lnterlocl< Device (IID) installation required for reinstatement. 



COURT CONVICTED ACTIONS 

If you receive a ticket and a judge finds you guilty of Driving While 
Intoxicated (DWI) or Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAG) of .08% or more, 
you will not be able to legally drive after the ticl<et is sent to the department. 
Your license will be suspended, revoked, or denied based on your past 
driving record and the points added to your record. You will be notified by 
mail when you must stop driving. The chart on the next page shows the 
consequences of a court convicted action like DWI or BAG: 



77 



Crime 


Fines/Jail 


Driver License 
Suspension, 
Revocation, or Denial 


To Get Your 
License Back 


BAC 

Driving/ 
operating 
a vehicle 
with .08% 
Blood 
Alcohol 
Content or 
more 

and/or 

DWI 

Driving 
while 

intoxicated. 


1st Offense - 

Spend up to 6 
months in jail. 
Pay up to a 
$500 fine. 

2nd Offense - 

Spend up to 1 
year in jail. 
Pay up to a 
$1000 fine. 

3rd Offense - 

Spend up to 
4 years in jail. 
Pay up to a 
$5,000 fine. 

4th Offense - 

Spend up to 7 
years in jail. 
Pay up to a 
$5,000 fine. 

5th Offense - 

Spend 

between 5 and 
15 years in jail. 


1 St Offense - 

30 day suspension, 
followed by a 60-day 
restricted driving 
privilege. 

*2nd Offense - 

1 -year license revoca- 
tion. 

*2nd Offense Within 


Please see 
page 80 
for 

Reinstatement 
Requirements 


5 Years - 5-vear 


license denial. 

NOTE: Only a BAC 
with a conviction date 
of August 28, 2009 
or after can be used 
toward a five-year 
denial. 

*3rd Offense - 


1 0-year license 
denial. 

*3rd and Subsequent 


Offenses - 1 0-vear 


license denial. 



*IID installation required for reinstatement. 



78 



MISSOURI'S ABUSE AND LOSE LAW 

If you are younger than 21 years of age, your driver license may be 
taken away for 90 days for any of tlie following: 

• Any alcohol-related traffic offense 

• If you possess or use alcohol or drugs while driving a vehicle 

• If you alter, modify, or misrepresent a driver license 

• If you are under 18 years of age and possess or use alcohol and are 
charged with a second offense. 

If you are 21 years of age or older, you may have your driver license 
taken away for one year if you possess or use drugs while driving. To get 
your license back, you must: 

• Pay a $45 fee 

• Submit a form showing you completed a Substance Abuse Traffic 
Offender Program (SATOP) or comparable program 

Minor In Possession (MIP) and Other Alcohol Offenses 

If you are older than 15 years of age and under 21 years of age, 

a state court may suspend or revoke your driver license for any of the 
following: 

• Purchasing or attempting to purchase any intoxicating liquor 

• Possessing any intoxicating liquor (consumption constitutes possession). 

• Being visibly intoxicated as defined in Section 577.001, RSMo. 

• Having a Blood Alcohol Content (BAG) level of more than .02% 

The following chart shows the consequences a young person faces for 
MIP and other alcohol offenses: 



Crime 


Driver License 

Suspension/ 

Revocation 


To Get Your 
License Back 


MIP 

Minor in 
Possession 


1st Offense — so-day 
suspension 

2nd Offense — 90-dav 
suspension 

3rd Offense — 1 -year 
revocation 


Pay a $45 fee, and attend a 
Substance Abuse Traffic 
Offender Program (SATOP) 
or comparable program. 



PROOF OF INSURANCE 

If you are facing consequences of a DWI or BAG, you will be required to 
file proof of insurance with the Driver License Bureau. The most common 
method of filing proof of insurance is an SR-22 insurance filing. Proof 
of insurance must be kept on file with the Driver License Bureau for two 
years. If you do not keep proof of insurance on file, your driver license 
will be suspended for the rest of the two years unless you file proof of 
insurance and pay a $20 fee. 



79 



There is one exception to tliis rule: IVIinors with a BAG of .02% or more do 
not have to file proof of insurance on a first offense. 

IVIore information about insurance is included in Chapter 13 of this Guide. 

Refusal to Submit to a Chemical Test of Your Blood Alcohol 
Concentration (BAC) 

If a police officer stops you and you refuse to take a chemical test to determine 
your BAG, your driver license will be taken away for one year. Your driver 
license may be reinstated if you submit the requirements listed below. 

Reinstatement Requirements for Alcohol-Related Offenses 

Your license will be reinstated if you: 

• Pay a $45 fee; 

• Submit a form showing you completed a Substance Abuse Traffic 
Offender Program (SATOP) or comparable program; 

• Provide proof of insurance for two years (SR-22 filing);and 

• Have an ignition interlock device (IID) installed on any vehicle you 
operate for at least six months from date of reinstatement (This 
requirement becomes effective July 1 , 2009 and applies only if you had a 
prior alcohol-related contact). 

Ignition Interlock 

An ignition interlock device (IID) is a mechanical unit that is connected to 
the vehicle's ignition, horn, and headlights and measures the concentration 
of alcohol in a person's breath. The IID requires vehicle operators to 
provide a breath sample before starting the vehicle and periodically during 
the operation of the vehicle. 

If you have more than one alcohol-related contact showing on your driver 
record, you must have an IID installed on any vehicle you operate before 
your driving privilege can be reinstated. The IID must be installed for 
a minimum of six months from your reinstatement date. You must pay 
for having the device installed and for having it serviced every month. 
If you fail to maintain the IID during the six-month period, your driving 
privilege will be re-suspended. You will be required to have the device 
serviced/installed, send proof to the Driver License Bureau, and pay a $20 
reinstatement fee before having your driving privilege reinstated. 

In addition to driver licensing requirements, a court may impose other 
requirements such as: IID use for the first DWI conviction; or use of a 
device for longer than six months. 

If you receive a ticket for failing to have an IID installed as required by 
law and you are convicted in court, your driving privilege will be revoked 
for one-year. A second offense requires your driving privilege to be taken 
away for five years. 

To locate a list of approved ignition interlock devices and installers, visit 
www.modot.mo.gov/safety/lmpairedDriving.htm or contact the IVIissouri 
Department of Transportation at 800-800-2358. 



80 



CHAPTER 11 — THE POINT SYSTEM AND 
HOW IT AFFECTS YOU 



Driving is a privilege, not a riglit. You can lose your driving privilege if you 
disobey the traffic laws. When you are convicted of a traffic violation, while 
your vehicle was in motion, the department receives notice and adds points 
to your driving record. This isn't like a football or basketball game — you 
don't want these points. You can lose your driving privilege when you 
accumulate too many points. 

The number of points you receive depends on the conviction. For example, 
you may receive 2 or 3 points if you are convicted of speeding (depending 
on if the court was municipal, county, or state level). By contrast, you may 
receive 12 points and the revocation of your driving privilege if you are 
convicted of leaving the scene of an accident. 

The following are examples of some state law violations and the point 



values associated with them: 

Violation Point Value 

Speeding 3 points 

Careless & Imprudent Driving 4 points 

Knowingly Allowing an Unlicensed Driver 

to Operate a Vehicle 4 points 

A Felony Involving a Motor Vehicle 12 points 

Obtaining a Driver License by 

Misrepresentation 12 points 

Operating a Vehicle with a Suspended 

or Revoked Driver License 12 points 



RACKING UP POINTS: THE CONSEQUENCES 

If you accumulate a total of 4 points in 12 months , the department will send 
you a point accumulation advisory. 

If you accumulate a total of 8 or more points in 18 months , your driving 
privilege will be suspended. Below are the consequences for accumulating 
8 points in 18 months: 

• 1st suspension — 30 days 

• 2nd suspension — 60 days 

• 3rd (or subsequent) suspension — 90 days 

Your driving privilege will be revoked for one year if you accumulate: 

• 12 or more points in 12 months 

• 18 or more points in 24 months 

• 24 or more points in 36 months 

Depending on whether your suspension or revocation was related to 
alcohol, there are different reinstatement requirements. 

For a non-alcohol related point suspension or revocation, you will need to: 

• Submit proof of insurance (SR-22) and 

• Pay a $20 reinstatement fee. 



81 



For an alcohol-related point suspension or revocation, you will need to 
submit the reinstatement requirements on page 80. 

Details about submitting proof of insurance (SR-22) can be found in 
Chapter 13, Mandatory Insurance. 

HOW POINTS COME OFF YOUR DRIVING RECORD 

When your driving privilege is reinstated, the department reduces your total 
points to 4. Every year you drive without getting new points on your record, 
the points will be reduced. 

• After 1 year — Remaining points will be reduced by one-third 

• After 2 years — Remaining points will be reduced by one-half 

• After 3 years — Points reduced to zero 

Although your points may be reduced to zero, certain convictions must 
remain listed permanently on your driving record. 

OTHER CONSEQUENCES 

Driving While Your License is Suspended or Revoked 

If you drive while your license is suspended, your driving privilege may be 
revoked for one year after you are convicted. If you continue to drive while 
your license is revoked, you may be convicted of a felony and have your 
license revoked again for one year. 

Failure to Appear in Court for Traffic Violations (FACT) 

When you fail to appear in court for a traffic violation, the court will notify 
you within 10 days of your failure to comply. The court will give you 30 
days to pay the fines before the court notifies the Driver License Bureau. 
If you do not comply within 30 days, the court will notify the Driver 
License Bureau of your failure to comply, and your driving privilege will be 
suspended immediately. 

If this happens to you, your driving privilege will be suspended until the 
Bureau receives: 

• Proof that the ticket is paid and 

• A $20 reinstatement fee. 

If your license is suspended for FACT, you may get your driving privilege 
reinstated in one of three ways. 

1 . Take the reinstatement requirements to a license office. The information 
will be faxed to the Driver License Bureau in Jefferson City for review. 
A reinstatement letter will be prepared and faxed to the license office 
to be given to you. If your driver license was previously surrendered, a 
temporary driving receipt will also be faxed. Your driver license will be 
mailed to you from the Driver License Bureau in Jefferson City. 



82 



2. Mail the reinstatement requirements to the Driver License Bureau, P.O. 
Box 3950, Jefferson City, Missouri 65105-3950. 

3. Bring the reinstatement requirements to the Driver License Bureau in the 
Harry S Truman State Office Building at 301 West High Street, Jefferson 
City, Missouri, in Room 470. Office hours are 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Monday through Friday (except holidays). 



ALL OCCUPANTS OF YOUR 
VEHICLE SHOULD BUCKLE UP — 
EVERY TRIP, EVERY TIME! 



83 



CHAPTER 12 — VEHICLE TITLING 
AND REGISTRATION 



TITLING YOUR VEHICLE 

Whether you are a Missouri resident buying a new vehicle or a new 
resident who recently moved to Missouri, you have 30 days to visit your 
local license office and take care of your legal responsibilities to title your 
vehicle. 

A title is proof that you own your vehicle. When you buy a vehicle, you 
must apply for a title within 30 days. If you do not apply within 30 days, 
you will have to pay a penalty fee. 

You may apply for a title at any license office. The title will cost $8.50, and 
you will be required to pay a $2.50 processing fee. You will have to pay all 
state and local sales taxes due. For information on the amount of sales tax 
you will have to pay, contact any license office, call (573) 526-3669, or visit 
our website at www.dor.mo.gov and enter "sales tax calculator" into the 
search box. 

When you apply for a title, you will receive a receipt. You will receive your 
title in the mail from the Department of Revenue. 

A title is a very important personal document. Do NOT keep your title in 
your vehicle. 

WHAT YOU NEED TO GET A TITLE 

The requirements are different for new and used vehicles and for vehicles 
bought in Missouri and outside Missouri. Following is a description of the 
requirements for these situations. 

VEHICLES BOUGHT IN MISSOURI 

• New Vehicle Bought in Missouri — The dealer will give you a title 
application and an assigned Manufacturer's Statement of Origin. The 
Manufacturer's Statement of Origin indicates the vehicle is new and has 
never been registered. You (the purchaser) and the dealer must complete 
the odometer disclosure portion on the back of the Manufacturer's 
Statement of Origin. 

• Used Vehicle Bought in Missouri — You must receive a properly 
assigned title (see below for an explanation) from the seller that proves 
you have bought the vehicle. If you bought the used vehicle from a 
dealer, you should also receive a completed title application. A proper 
odometer disclosure on the back of the title is required on vehicles 
that are less than 10 years old. If the title assigned to you is an out-of- 
state title, you must get an identification number and odometer (ID/OD) 
verification form completed by a licensed inspection station. 

VEHICLES BOUGHT OUT-OF-STATE (NOT IN MISSOURI) 

• New Vehicle Bought Out-of-State — You must receive the dealer's 
invoice or a bill of sale and assigned Manufacturer's Statement of 
Origin from the out-of-state dealer. You (the purchaser) and the dealer 
must complete the odometer disclosure portion on the back of the 
Manufacturer's Statement of Origin. 

84 



• Used Vehicle Bought Out-of-State — You must receive either a properly 
assigned title (see below for an explanation) from the seller or a 
reassigned title from the dealer. If the state does not require a title, you 
must get a bill of sale and the vehicle's last certificate of registration in 
that state. A proper odometer disclosure is required on vehicles less 
than 10 years old. If the title assigned to you is an out-of-state title, you 
must get an identification number and odometer (ID/OD) verification form 
completed by a licensed inspection station. 

Properly Assigned Titles 

A properly assigned title has the following information completed in the 
assignment area: 

• Buyer's name and address; 

• Odometer reading, if applicable; 

• Sale price of vehicle; 

• Date of the sale; 

• Name of any lienholder, if applicable; 

• Signature and printed name of all sellers; and 

• Buyer's printed name and signature, if applicable. 

Salvage Vehicles 

For information on titling a vehicle bought for salvage, dismantling, or 
rebuilding, call (573) 526-3669, or write to: 

Missouri Department of Revenue 

IVIotor Vehicle Bureau 

301 West High Street, Room 370 

P.O. Box 100 

Jefferson City, Missouri 65105-0100 
Odometer Readings 

When you buy or sell a vehicle that is less than 10 years old, the seller 
must write the mileage reading on the title assignment. If the vehicle is 
new, the odometer reading must be on the Manufacturer's Statement of 
Origin. Both the buyer and the seller must print and sign their names 
verifying the mileage. In some instances, a separate odometer statement 
may be required. 

REGISTERING YOUR VEHICLE 

If you are a Missouri resident, you are required to register your vehicle in 
Missouri. If you are a new Missouri resident, you must register your vehicle 
within 30 days of becoming a Missouri resident. 

If you are a new Missouri resident, you must surrender your out-of-state 
title and apply for a Missouri title. If a financial institution has your title, 
you must provide your out-of-state registration, lienholder's name, and 
lienholder's address. The license office will generate a letter for you 
to send to your lienholder. After you surrender your out-of-state title, a 
Missouri title will be issued and mailed to you. 

When you register your vehicle in Missouri, you will receive Missouri 
license plates and a year tab located on the plate. 



85 



You may register your vehicle at any license office. If you are registering 
a passenger vehicle, your registration fee will be based on your vehicle's 
taxable horsepower. If you are registering a commercial vehicle, your 
registration fee will be based on its zone and gross weight. An additional 
processing fee will apply. 

You may be eligible to obtain a two-year registration for your vehicle. 
During an even-numbered year (like 2008) you may register for two years if 
your vehicle has an even-numbered model year. Likewise, during an odd- 
numbered year (like 2009) you may register for two years if your vehicle 
has an odd-numbered model year. Otherwise, only a one-year registration 
is available. 

What You Need to Register Your Vehicle 

About two months before your vehicle registration expires, you should 
receive a renewal notice in the mail. If you do not receive the notice, you 
are still required by law to renew your license plates before they expire. 

To ensure you receive a renewal notice, remember to update your address 
if you move. You can e-mail dormail@dor.mo.gov and include your full 
name, old and new address, your driver license number or last four digits of 
your Social Security Number, and your vehicle's license plate number(s). 

The renewal notice will list your requirements to renew your vehicle 
registration. IVIake sure to read the list and bring the required documents 
to the license office with you. The requirements are listed below but all of 
them may not apply to you. 

• Renewal notice from the department, a registration receipt from the 
previous year, or a copy of your title. 

• Paid personal property tax receipt or a statement of non-assessment 
from the county in which you reside (or city of St. Louis) for the period of 
your previous registration. (If you had a one-year registration, show the 
previous year's receipt. If you had a two-year registration, show receipts 
from the previous two years.) 

• Current insurance identification card or other proof of financial 
responsibility (refer to Chapter 13 for detailed information). 

• Current certificate of safety and/or emissions inspection done within the 
last 60 days, if applicable (refer to Chapter 14 for more information). 

• The correct registration/processing fee. 

TIP! You may also be able to renew your plates online at www.piates.mo.gov. 

If you are eligible for this convenient option, a Personal Identification Number 
(PIN) will be printed on your renewal notice. 



86 



OTHER INFORMATION 



Selling a Vehicle 

State law requires you to report the sale of your motor vehicle or all-terrain 
vehicle by completing a Notice of Sale (DOR-5049) and submitting it to any 
license office or to the address on the form within 30 days. 

Stolen License Plates and Tabs 

State law allows you to replace stolen license plates/tabs up to two times 
per year at NO COST (a $3.50 processing fee is applicable) if you sign a 
notarized affidavit certifying the plates or tabs were stolen. 

Lost or Destroyed Title, Plates, or Tabs 

If your license plate(s), tab(s), or title is lost or destroyed, you must apply 
for a replacement. The charge for a replacement title is $8.50; the charge 
for replacement plates is $8.50 per plate; and the charge for a set of 
replacement tabs is $8.50. An additional processing fee of $3.50 will also 
apply. 

Missouri License Plate Information 

The words "SHOW ME STATE" appear across the bottom of the standard 
license plate. A year tab is located on the license plate. Each year tab is a 
different color. 

Personalized Plates 

When you register your vehicle, you may apply for personalized 
license plates. In addition to the normal registration fee, the charge for 
personalized plates is $15 for a one-year registration and $30 for a two- 
year registration. More information regarding personalized/specialty plates 
may be obtained online at www.dor.mo.gov/mvdl/motorv/plates. 



87 



CHAPTER 13 — MANDATORY INSURANCE 



THE BASICS 

State law requires all motor vehicle operators and owners to have a form of 
liability insurance. Liability insurance covers the policyholder's legal liability 
resulting from injuries to other persons or damage to their property. This is 
called Financial Responsibility. 

Motor vehicle owners are required to show proof of insurance when 
registering a vehicle or renewing their license plates. There are several 
ways you can provide proof of insurance. They are listed below: 

• A copy of your original, current insurance identification card given to you 
by your insurance company 

• A copy of your motor vehicle liability insurance policy or insurance binder 
(a temporary policy) 

• A paid insurance receipt showing the policy information 

• A certificate of self-insurance issued by the department 

• An ID card issued by the department when a surety bond, real estate 
bond, or security is filed with the department 

• Hand held electronic device 

Most drivers obtain liability insurance through an insurance company or 
agent, but there are other forms of liability insurance: 

• Self-insurance: To be self-insured, you must have more than 25 vehicles 
and be able to show you can and will pay for damage caused by your 
vehicles. A certificate of self-insurance will be issued to you by the 
Department of Revenue. 

• Surety bond. Real Estate bond, Certificate of Deposit, Other Negotiable 
Securities: To insure through a bond, deposit, or security, you must file 
the bond, certificate, or security in the amount of $60,000 (or $120,000 if 
a real estate bond) with the Department of Revenue. The department will 
issue you a certificate of self-insurance as proof of insurance. 

• Cash: A deposit of $60,000 cash may be deposited with the State 
Treasurer. A certificate of self-insurance will be issued to you by the 
department. 

Minimum Coverage Requirements 

Liability insurance covers your legal liability when injuries or property 
damage happen to others as a result of your actions. The minimum level 
of coverage required by state law is shown below: 

• $25,000 per person for bodily injury 

• $50,000 per accident for bodily injury 

• $10,000 per accident for property damage 

The law also requires you to have uninsured motorist coverage of $25,000 
for bodily injury per person and $50,000 for bodily injury per accident. 

Maintaining Your Insurance 

When you register a vehicle with the department, you must sign a form 
stating that you have insurance and will keep insurance on your vehicle. 

88 



You must keep proof of insurance in your veiiicle. If a law enforcement 
officer asks you for proof and you cannot show it, you will receive a ticket. 

At any time, the department may require you to show proof of insurance. If 
you are in an accident and did not show proof of insurance at the time, the 
department will require you to prove you have insurance. 

Failure to Keep Insurance 

Insurance is important. There are a number of consequences if you fail to 
keep your insurance — not only can it cost you a lot of money if you are in 
an accident, but you may lose your driver license and license plates. 

If the department learns you have not kept your insurance, you will receive 
a notice of suspension in the mail. Your driver license and license plates 
may be taken away or suspended for not having insurance. In order to get 
your license and license plates back, there are certain requirements you 
must meet. 



Number of 
Suspensions 


What Happens to You 


1 suspension 


Your driver license and/or license plates will be 
suspended until you: 

- Pay a $20 fee. 

- File proof of insurance. You are required to do 
this for 3 years. 


2 suspensions 
(within 2 years 
of each other) 


Your driver license and/or license plates will be 
suspended for 90 days. You must also: 

- Pay a $200 fee. 

- File proof of insurance for 3 years. 


3 (or more) 
suspensions 


Your driver license and/or license plates will be 
suspended for one year. You must also: 

- Pay a $400 fee. 

- File proof of insurance for 3 years. 



The most common way to file proof of insurance is through an SR-22 
insurance filing. Contact your insurance company or agent to file the 
SR-22 form. If you fail to keep insurance for three years, your driver 
license and/or vehicle license plates will be suspended again. 

Failure to Pay for Damages Caused in an Accident 

If you are at fault in an accident and do not pay for the damages you 
caused, your driver license and/or vehicle license plates will be suspended 
for one year. You may be reinstated during that one-year period if you do 
the following: 

• Pay a $20 fee. 

• Send proof to the Department of Revenue Driver License Bureau that you 
have settled the damages. 



89 



ACCIDENTS AND CRASHES 

An accident is wlien you injure yourself, injure someone else, or cause 
damage to property while driving your vehicle. Driving responsibly and 
defensively can reduce your chances of being in an accident, but nothing 
can totally prevent it. Even if you have an accident with a parked vehicle, 
do not leave. Leaving the scene of an accident is a crime. If you are in an 
accident, you should: 

• STOP! Move your vehicle off the road if possible, especially if it may 
cause other accidents. 

• Help anyone who is hurt. Try to make the injured person comfortable, but 
do not move him or her. Call an ambulance. 

• Call the police. 

• Use flares, reflectors, or flashlights to warn other traffic if the accident has 
happened at night or in bad weather. 

• Exchange the following information with everyone involved: 

• Name 

• Address 

• Driver license number, vehicle identification number (VIN), and 
license plate number 

• Name of your insurance company and policy number 

• Stay until a law enforcement officer says you may leave the accident 
scene. 

• Contact your insurance company as soon as possible, even if the 
accident wasn't your fault. 

"Steer It and Clear It" 

If you're involved in a minor traffic crash, one of the first thoughts you might 
have is whether or not you should move your vehicle. The answer is yes. 

A state law that took effect 10 years ago requires vehicles involved in 
minor, non-injury crashes to move off the road. The Missouri Department 
of Transportation is using the 10-year anniversary to remind motorists to 
"steer it and clear it" to ensure minor traffic crashes don't turn into major 
pileups. The agency is also putting up signs in the St. Louis and Kansas 
City areas with the "steer it and clear it" message. 

"If you're involved in a minor traffic crash and there aren't any injuries, you 
need to move your vehicle onto the shoulder or other nearby location off of 
the roadway. Every minute a vehicle stops on the freeway and blocks one 
lane of traffic, it backs up approaching traffic for four minutes." 

The law, known as the "Move It" law also helps reduce the chance of 
motorists being involved in secondary crashes, which cause 18 percent of 
fatalities in Missouri. 



90 



Filing an Accident Report 

Under certain circumstances, you are required to file an accident report witti 
tlie department. State law requires the accident report to be filed within 
30 days. Even if the accident happened in a parking lot, or a settlement is 
made, you must report an accident to the Driver License Bureau if: 

1. The accident happened in Missouri; 

2. The accident happened less than one year ago; 

3. Someone involved in the accident did not have liability insurance 
coverage; AND 

4. There is damage to one or more person's property in excess of $500, 
or there was personal injury or death. 

In other circumstances, you may not be required to report the accident, 
but you may want to report it anyway. If the accident did not cause more 
than $500 in property damage, personal injury, or death, you may still 
file an accident report if there was an uninsured motorist involved. The 
department will only be able to take action against the uninsured motorist 
for not maintaining insurance. 

You may obtain an accident report from the department's web site at 
www.dor.mo.gov/mvdl, from your insurance company or agent, or from 
any license office. 

After you fill out the accident report, you may mail or fax it to the 
department: 

Missouri Driver License Bureau 

301 West High Street — Room 470 

Post Office Box 200 

Jefferson City, Missouri 65105-0200 

FAX: (573) 526-7365 



91 



CHAPTER 14 — SAFETY AND EMISSIONS 
INSPECTIONS AND REQUIRED EQUIPMENT 



SAFETY INSPECTIONS 

Safety inspections are required to register or renew the registration on 
many motor veliicles. Tliere are some exceptions, wliich are discussed in 
the next section. 

Chapter 10 discussed that you need to be in shape to drive. Just the same, 
your vehicle needs to be in shape to be driven. 

Your vehicle safety inspection is good for two registration years unless you 
sell the vehicle. "Even" model year vehicles (like 2008) must be inspected 
when their registration expires during "even" calendar years. "Odd" model 
year vehicles (like 2007) must be inspected when their registration expires 
during "odd" calendar years. Each official inspection station may charge an 
inspection fee not to exceed $12 (or up to $10 for a motorcycle inspection). 

If your vehicle passes the safety inspection, the inspection station will give 
you a certificate of inspection to show as proof. The certificate is good for 
60 days. 

Your vehicle registration renewal notice will indicate whether an inspection 
is required for your next renewal. 

Exceptions to the Requirement 

The following types of vehicles are exempt from the safety inspection 
requirement: 

• Motor vehicles are exempt for the first five years following the model year of 
manufacture even when there is a change of ownership. This includes 
vehicles with an out-of-state title. Example: A 2007 model year vehicle is 
exempt from safety inspection in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 201 1 , and 2012. 

• All trailers 

• Motor vehicles engaged in intrastate commerce and registered with the 
Missouri Department of Transportation 

• Motor vehicles that display historic license plates 

• Motor vehicles sold for junk, salvage, or rebuilding 

• Motor vehicles sold from dealer to dealer 

• Low speed vehicles as defined in Section 304.029, RSMo 

• Motor vehicles registered for 26,000 pounds or above and registered for 
a period of less than 12 months. Note: Renewal notice will list a safety 
inspection requirement; however, if the office issues/renews the 
registration on or after April 1st an inspection is not required. 

If your vehicle does not fit into the exceptions 
listed above, it will be required to pass a safety 
inspection. Any licensed inspection station may 
inspect your vehicle for safety. Authorized stations 
will display the sign shown on the bottom of page 
92. Read your motor vehicle renewal notice to find 
out whether your vehicle needs a safety inspection. 



OFFICIAL 




INSPECTIOM STATION 



92 



Equipment Needed 

BRAKES — Brakes must be in good working order. 

HEADLIGHTS — Your veliicle must have at least two wliite headlights. 

TAILLIGHTS — Your vehicle must have at least two red taillights and 
reflectors that other drivers can see from 500 feet. 

SIGNALING DEVICES — Your vehicle must have turn signals and brake 
lights as originally installed by the manufacturer. 

STEERING MECHANISM — Your vehicle's steering mechanism must not 
have too much play or binding. 

TIRES AND WHEELS — You must not have bald or mismatched tires on 
your vehicle. 

SAFETY GLASS — If your vehicle was made after January 1 , 1936, it 
must have safety glass in all windows. 

WINDSHIELD — The viewing area of your windshield may not be badly 
broken. 

VISION REDUCING MATERIAL — Your vehicle must not have anything 
on the windshield that will reduce your visibility, except labels and stickers 
required by law or ordinance, and informational signs on the upper portion 
of the windshield normally tinted by manufacturers. 

WINDSHIELD WIPERS — Your vehicle's windshield wipers must work. 

SEAT BELTS — If your passenger car was made after June 30, 1964, it 
must have two sets of seat belts in the front seat. 

HORN — Your vehicle must have a horn that other drivers and pedestrians 
can hear. 

EXHAUST SYSTEM — Your vehicle must have an attached exhaust pipe, 
muffler, and tailpipe. 

MIRRORS — If your vehicle was made after 1967, it must have an inside 
and an outside rearview mirror. 

AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICES — If your vehicle was made after 
1967 and does not have a diesel motor, it must have air pollution control 
devices. These pollution control devices must be as originally installed by 
the manufacturer. 

FUEL SYSTEM — The fuel system, including all lines, hoses, connections, 
and tank(s), must be firmly attached and must not leak. 

MUD FLAPS — Trucks without rear fenders, registered for over 24,000 
pounds, must have mud flaps. 



93 



BUMPERS — Bumpers on passenger vehicles may not exceed 22 inches 
above the ground when measured at the highest point. Commercial vehicle 
bumper heights are determined by gross vehicle weight rating. 

Other Equipment Required by Law 

In addition to the equipment needed to pass the safety inspection, IVlissouri 
law requires the following equipment: 

LICENSE (REGISTRATION) PLATES — Missouri law requires that license 
plates be securely fastened to a vehicle, and that all parts of the plates are 
visible and clean for view or Inspection by any law enforcement entity. If 
you have frames around your license plates, the Missouri State Highway 
Patrol reminds you that the frames must not cover any part of the plates. 

If you receive two plates , you must place one on the front and one on the 
back of your vehicle. 

If you have a trailer or a motorcycle , you will only receive one plate, which 
must be on the back of your vehicle. 

If vou have a truck licensed In excess of 12,000 pounds , you will only 
receive one plate, which must be placed on the front of the truck. If you 
want a second plate. It must be specifically requested. You must place the 
original plate on the front of your truck and If a second plate Is issued. It 
must be placed on the rear of the truck. 

LICENSE PLATE LIGHT — Your vehicle must have a white light shining 
on the rear license plate so the plate can be seen from 50 feet. 

PROJECTIONS — You need special equipment If something in your 
vehicle overhangs the rear by more than 5 feet. During the day, the end of 
the projection must have a red flag or cloth that is at least 16" square. The 
end of the projection must have a red light from Vi hour after sunset until Va 
hour before sunrise. 

TOWLINES — When you are towing another vehicle, your towllne must 
keep the vehicles within 15 feet of each other. From Vi hour after sunset 
until Vz hour before sunrise, both vehicles must have lights on. 

SLOW MOVING VEHICLE SIGN — From sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise, 
any vehicle moving 25 mph or slower must have a "slow moving vehicle" 
sign (refer to Chapter 3). The sign must be on the rear of the vehicle, near 
the middle, and 4 feet or more above the road. The sign must be clean 
and reflective. 

STUDDED SNOW TIRES — Your vehicle may have studded snow tires 
only from November 1 to April 1 . 

WINDOW TINTING — Tinting or sun-screening material Is permitted on 
the side and rear windows (front door windows at no more than 65% light 
blockage). 



94 



EMISSIONS INSPECTIONS 

Motorists residing in St. Louis City and the counties of St. Louis, St. 
Charles, Franl<lin, and Jefferson are also required to have emissions 
inspections, if applicable. There are some exceptions, which are listed 
below. 

For information on emissions inspections not covered in this Guide, please 
call 1-866-623-8378, or visit the Department of Natural Resources web site 
at www.dnr.mo.gov and look for the Gateway Vehicle Inspection Program 
(GVIP). 

The emissions inspection is a two-year inspection. Just like the safety 
inspection, "even" model year vehicles with registrations expiring in "even" 
years must be inspected during "even" calendar years. "Odd" model year 
vehicles with registrations expiring in "odd" years must be inspected during 
"odd" calendar years. 

All vehicles must be emissions inspected at the time of sale regardless of 
the model year (refer to the list of exceptions below). New motor vehicles 
and the first retail sale of titled motor vehicles during the model year of the 
vehicle and the following year, are exempt from the inspection requirement 
provided the odometer reading is less than 6,000 miles at the time of sale. 

Exceptions to the Requirement 

The following motor vehicles are exempt from the emissions inspection 
requirement: 

• New motor vehicles, not previously titled, during the model year of the 
vehicle and the following year, provided there is no change in ownership. 

• 1995 and older gasoline-powered vehicles 

• 1996 and older diesel-powered vehicles 

• Motor vehicles with a manufacturer's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) 
over 8,500 pounds 

• New motor vehicles not previously titled and registered for the four-year 
period following their model year of manufacture, with fewer than 40,000 
miles at the first required biennial inspection 

• Motor vehicles that are driven fewer than 12,000 miles between biennial 
safety inspections 

• Vehicles powered by fuels other than gasoline, ethanol or diesel 

• Motor vehicles that display "historic plates," school bus, shuttle bus, 
motorcycle, motortricycle, or street rod plates 

• Gasoline-powered low speed vehicles in Franklin County only 

• Motor vehicles registered in one of the affected areas (St. Louis City and 
the counties of St. Louis, St. Charles, Franklin, and Jefferson) but based 
and operated outside the area for 24 consecutive months 



95 



CHAPTER 15 — COMMERCIAL VEHICLES 



You will need to know the following information if you are applying for a 
Class E license. As a driver of a commercial vehicle, you must obey all 
Missouri traffic laws including the laws on commercial vehicles. 

Note: 

1. All size and weight limits listed below include the load of the vehicle. 

2. All limits that refer to interstates or certain designated highways include 
roads up to 10 miles from the interstate or highway. 

3. The size and weight and exceptions listed in this chapter are for 
IVIissouri highways only. 

SIZE LIMITATIONS (WITHOUT SPECIAL PERMIT) 
HEIGHT 

1 . IVIaximum height of any vehicle outside of a commercial 



zone* on designated highways plus 10 miles therefrom 14' 

2. IVIaximum height of any vehicle in a commercial zone 15' 

3. Maximum height on all other highways 131/2' 

WIDTH 

1 . Maximum width of any vehicle 8V2' 



'COMMERCIAL ZONE — Commercial zones exist only in cities with a 
population of 75,000 or more. The commercial zone is one mile beyond the 
city limits plus one mile for every 50,000 residents or portion thereof, except: 

• The commercial zone for St. Louis City extends 18 miles beyond the city 
limits. 

• The commercial zone for Kansas City extends 12 miles beyond the city 
limits and includes the city of Harrisonville. 

• The commercial zones for Springfield, St. Joseph, and Columbia extends 



only 2 miles beyond the city limits. 
• The commercial zone on interstate highways extends only 2 miles 
beyond the city limits. 

LENGTH 

1. Maximum length of any single vehicle 45' 

2. Maximum length of any bus or trackless trolley coach not 
including one foot in front and back for safety bumper 45' 

3. Maximum length of truck-tractor and semi-trailer 

• upon interstates and certain designated highways the length of 

the semi-trailer (no overall maximum length, includes load) 53' 

• upon all other roads 60' 



96 



4. Maximum length of truck-tractor, semi-trailer, and trailer 
combinations (double bottoms) 

• upon interstates and certain designated highways the length of the 



semi-trailer or trailer (no overall maximum length) 28' 

• upon all other roads 65 

5. Maximum length of truck and trailer(s) and all other 
combinations of vehicles 

• upon interstates and certain primary highways 65' 

• the overall maximum length upon all other roads 55' 

6. Maximum length of Automobile Transporters and 
Boat Transporters 



• Conventional 5th Wheel 75' combination unit plus 

• Stingersteered 75' 3' front to 4' rear overhang. 

7. Maximum length of Driveaway Saddle Mount Combinations (Double or 
Triple on interstate and designated highways) 97' 

Motor vehicle carriers may carry loads that extend beyond their legal length 
limits. Loads must not extend more than 3 feet beyond the front or 4 feet 
beyond the rear of the vehicle. 

EXEMPTIONS FROM SIZE LIMITS 

1 . Farm machinery driven occasionally for short distances 

2. Vehicles temporarily transporting farm machinery 

3. Implement dealers delivering or moving farm machinery for repair 

4. Vehicles temporarily transporting road-making machines or road 
materials 

5. Vehicles towing disabled vehicles for repair on highways 
These exemptions do not include interstate highways. 

WEIGHT LIMITATIONS (WITHOUT SPECIAL PERMIT) 

A bridge's weight limit may differ from the road's weight limit. If a bridge 



has a different weight limit, the limit will be posted. 

MAXIMUM WEIGHT ON ANY SINGLE AXLE POUNDS 

1 . Maximum weight allowed on interstates 20,000 

2. Maximum weight allowed in a commercial zone 22,400 

3. Maximum weight allowed on all other routes 22,000 

MAXIMUM WEIGHT ON ANY TANDEM AXLE POUNDS 

1 . Maximum weight allowed on interstates 34,000 

2. Maximum weight allowed on all other routes 36,000 

MAXIMUM GROSS WEIGHT POUNDS 



The actual gross weight allowed depends on the distance from the first to 
last axle. To determine the maximum gross weight allowed in a commercial 
zone, multiply the number of axles by 22,400 pounds. 80, 000 pounds 
maximum gross weight is allowed on all highways in Missouri, except 
where bridge structures are posted with lesser weight limits. 
1 . Maximum gross weight allowed on interstates, primary and 

other designated highways 80,000 



97 



OVERDIMENSION AND OVERWEIGHT PERMITS 

You may apply for an overdimension or overweight permit by calling 1-800- 
877-8499, or (573) 751-2871 for local calls only, or by contacting: 

IVIissouri Department of Transportation, IVIotor Carrier Services Unit 

P. O. Box 893 

Jefferson City, MO 65102 

Fax: (573) 751 -7408 

To receive an oversize or overweight permit: 

• the load on your vehicle must be non-reducible, 

• you must have property damage and bodily injury liability insurance, and 

• you must pay a permit fee. 

VEHICLE ROUTE MAP 

The Missouri Vehicle Route Map is available from the Missouri Department 
of Transportation. This map shows the routes on which the larger and 
heavier trucks are allowed to travel as specified by state statute. You may 
obtain a map by calling 1-866-831-6277 or by contacting: 

Missouri Department of Transportation, Motor Carrier Services 

P. O. Box 893 

Jefferson City, MO 65102 

Fax: (573) 751 -7408 

contactus @ modot. mo.gov 

FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS 

Missouri has adopted as state law Parts 390 through 397 of the Federal 
Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. Therefore, drivers and vehicles 
operating solely intrastate must obey those regulations except for the 
following exemptions: 

• Commercial vehicles with a GVWR or GCWR of 26,000 lbs. or less than 
26,001 GVWR unless transporting hazardous materials or passengers. 

• Commercial vehicles licensed for gross weight of 60,000 pounds or less 
when used only for the transportation of solid waste 

• Commercial vehicles licensed for 42,000 pounds or less for farm use and 
indicated by the letter "F" on the license plate as authorized by Missouri 
Revised Statutes, Section 301 .030 unless transporting hazardous 
materials except fertilizer. 

TRANSPORTING HAZARDOUS MATERIAL 

If you are transporting hazardous material, your vehicle must comply with 
the equipment and operating regulations of the United States Department 
of Transportation. 

EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND SIGNALS 

When operating wholly within the state, Missouri law does not require 
emergency equipment for: 

• Vehicles licensed for 42,000 pounds or less with an "F" plate, 

• Solid waste haulers licensed for 60,000 pounds or less, and 

• Commercial vehicles licensed for 12,000 pounds or less. 



98 



Any other commercial motor vehicle used for intra or interstate commerce 
that is licensed for more than 12,000 pounds must carry the following 
emergency equipment: 

• One fire extinguisher. The extinguisher must be rated at 5 B:C or more 
by Undenwriter's Laboratories Incorporated. 

• One spare fuse or other overload protective device for each kind and 
size used, if the devices are not of a reset type. 

• One of the following combination of warning devices: 

1 . Three flares (liquid-burning pot torches) and three fuses and two red 
flags. This combination must not be carried by vehicles transporting 
explosive or flammable material or using flammable compressed gas as 
a motor fuel. 

2. Three red electric lanterns and two red flags. 

3. Three bi-directional emergency red reflective triangles. 

INFORMATION ON COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES 

The following information must be clearly visible on commercial motor 
vehicles: 

• The name of the owner 

• The address the vehicle is operated from and the number issued to a 
motor carrier by the Motor Carrier Services. (USDOT 123456 IVIO) 

• The word "Local" displayed on every local commercial vehicle. 
For-hire carriers must display their USDOT number followed by the 
letters "MO". 

Your vehicle does not need to show the above information if: 

• It is licensed for 36,000 pounds or less, and 

• It is not regularly used for commercial purposes. 

FOLLOWING DISTANCE 

If you are driving a bus or truck, you must not follow another bus or truck 
any closer than 300 feet. However, you may follow closer than 300 feet 
when you are in a business or residential district or when passing. Always 
stay a safe distance behind the vehicle in front of you. For each 10 feet 
of length in your vehicle, keep at least one second between you and the 
vehicle in front of you. For example, if you are driving a 40-foot vehicle, 
keep four seconds between you and the vehicle in front of you. 



99 



RAILROAD CROSSING 

If you are driving a: 

• motor veliicle carrying passengers for liire, 

• school bus, 

• motor veliicle carrying material that is corrosive, flammable, explosive, or 
poisonous, or 

• motor vehicle used for the transportation of flammable or corrosive 
liquids in bulk, whether loaded or empty. 

You must stop within 15 to 50 feet before the railroad tracks. If there is no 
sign of a train, you may cross the tracks. 

LOAD SECURITY 

To avoid any part of a load falling off your vehicle, you must secure it or 
have a protective cover on it. 

OFF-TRACKING 

When a vehicle turns, the rear wheels take a shorter path than the front 
wheels. The greater the distance between the front and rear wheels, the 
greater the difference in their paths. To compensate for the off-tracking, 
begin a left turn as far to the right as possible. Begin a right turn as far to 
the left as possible. 

WEIGH STATIONS 

All commercial motor vehicles must stop at weight stations except those 
licensed for 18,000 lbs or less or otherwise exempted by law, unless 
directed by a peace officer. 

TAILGATERS 

To avoid an accident with a tailgater, you should: 

1 . Slow down. It is better to be tailgated at a low speed than a high speed. 

2. Avoid any sudden turns or stops and signal well in advance. 

3. Increase the distance between you and the vehicle in front of you. This 
will help you to avoid any sudden stops. 

4. Do not flash your taillights or brake lights at the tailgater. The tailgater 
may not believe your brake lights when you do slow down or stop. 

SPACE OVERHEAD 

IVIake sure you have enough space over your vehicle at all times. 

• Do not assume that posted heights at bridges or underpasses are 
correct. 

• Check all wires, signs, trees, and air conditioning units. 
SOFT SURFACES 

IVIake sure the surface will hold the weight of your vehicle. Be wary of: 

• Parking lots 

• Unpaved roads or parking areas, especially when wet 

• Construction areas 



100 



SPACE TO CROSS OR ENTER TRAFFIC 

Your acceleration rate varies witli tlie weigint of your veliicle. And your time 
to cross tlie road is also affected by tlie lengtfi of your vehicle. In a long or 
heavily weighted vehicle, you will need a larger gap to cross the road than 
you would in a car. 



PROPERLY SECURE OR COVER 
ANY LOAD YOU CARRY! 



101 



SAMPLE TEST QUESTIONS 



The Class F (regular operator) and Class E (For-Hire) written tests 
administered by the IVIissouri State Highway Patrol driver examiners are 
multiple-choice tests. The following sample test questions are provided 
as a study aid only, and are not meant to reflect actual questions from the 
IVIissouri written test(s). 

DIRECTIONS: Circle the correct answer. 

1. When you approach a railroad crossing without flashing warning 
signals or crossing gates, you should: 

a. cross the tracks as quickly as possible. 

b. always stop. 

c. yield to all trains at the crossing. 

d. speed up to beat the train. 

2. You may pass another vehicle by using the shoulder of the road: 

a. when the vehicle in front of you is making a left turn. 

b. to go around a slow moving vehicle. 

c. you are not allowed to pass on the shoulder of the road. 

d. when the traffic ahead is blocked up for 250 feet. 

3. If you miss your exit from an interstate expressway: 

a. stop in any lane of the highway 

b. get off at the next exit and come back to the exit you missed 

c. roll down your window and ask the driver next to you for help 

d. back up on the highway 

4. The minimum age that a person must be in order to obtain an 
Instruction Permit is: 

a. 14 years old 

b. 15 years old 

c. 15 1/2 years old 

d. 16 years old 

5. The fee for an Instruction Permit is: 

a. $1.00 

b. $2.00 

c. $3.50 

d. $4.00 

6. Shortly before your driver or nondriver license expires, the Driver 
License Bureau will mail a renewal reminder postcard to: 

a. the most current address on your driver record 

b. the address on your last application 

c. the address in your local phone book 

d. your local contract office 



102 



7. The minimum age that a person must be in order to obtain a 
motorcycle instruction permit is: 

a. 14 years old 

b. 15 years old 

c. 15 1/2 years old 

d. 16 years old 

8. For a driver with an intermediate license, the driving restrictions 
are: 

a. seat belt must be worn by the driver 

b. seat belts must be worn by all passengers 

c. a driving curfew from 1 :00 a.m to 5:00 a.m 

d. all of the above 

9. To help others know that you want to be an organ donor, you 
should: 

a. complete the organ donor information on the back of your license 

b. discuss your decision with your next of kin 

c. have two witnesses sign the back of your license 

d. all of the above 

10. Where should you go to take the Missouri driver examination 
tests: 

a. any Missouri State Highway Patrol examination station 

b. any Department of Transportation office 

c. any Missouri contract office 

d. the nearest high school driver education class 

11. The Missouri State Highway Patrol examiner will check the 
person's vehicle before beginning the driving test: 

a. to look for stolen car parts 

b. to make sure that the vehicle has the required equipment 

c. to make sure that the vehicle is in safe operating condition 

d. answers b and c 

12. If you fail the driving test three times: 

a. the examiner will give you a Driving Skills Examination Report 

b. you must send the above report to the Department of Revenue 

c. the Department of Revenue will require driver training 

d. all of the above 

13. Two solid yellow lines on the pavement mean: 

a. passing is allowed for both drivers 

b. passing is not allowed 

c. passing is allowed if you are at the top a hill 

d. passing is allowed during daylight only 



103 



14. The minimum and maximum speed limits on Missouri interstate 
highways are: 

a. 40/55 

b. 40/70 

c. 30/70 

d. 55/75 

15. A flashing red light on a traffic signal means: 

a. the same thing as a stop sign 

b. the traffic signal is broi<en 

c. you do not have to come to a complete stop 

d. driving conditions are dangerous 

16. A yellow signal light means: 

a. the traffic signal is changing from green to red 

b. you should slam on your brakes 

c. you should increase your speed 

d. the car in front of you is going too slow 

17. A speed restriction sign: 

a. may be ignored in rain, snow, or icy conditions 

b. has a triangular shape 

c. is blue with black lettering 

d. shows a recommended speed for a curve or turn 

18. When approaching a railroad crossing you should: 

a. slow down 

b. look for a train 

c be ready to stop 
d. all of the above 

19. Work zone signs mean: 

a. it is summer 

b. you must immediately stop and back up 

c. less than ideal conditions are present for driving 

d. you should drive faster to get out of the work zone 

20. A "No Right On Red" sign means: 

a. even if the traffic signal is red, you may turn right 

b. if the traffic signal is red, you cannot turn right 

c. the intersection has a high number of accidents 

d. even if the traffic signal is red, you do not have to come to a stop 

21. Emergency vehicles: 

a. have the right of way when using siren, horn, and red/blue lights 

b. may use a loudspeaker to give instructions 

c. may follow each other 

d. all of the above 



104 



22. After stopping for a school bus that is unloading children: 

a. do not proceed until the children wave to you 

b. watch for children walking along the side of the road 

c. accelerate quickly 

d. turn on your emergency flashers 

23. When making right or left turns, a driver should signal 

before the turn: 

a. 100 feet 

b. 50 feet 

c. 35 feet 

d. 5 feet 

24. A driver may use a handicapped parking space: 

a. if a physically handicapped person is in the motor vehicle when it 
is parked 

b. if a physically handicapped person is being delivered or picked up 

c. if the vehicle displays a handicapped person placard or license 
plates 

d. answers a and c, or b and c 

25. When parking you vehicle down hill on a two way street: 

a. turn your wheels to the right 

b. turn your wheels to the left 

c. keep your wheels pointed straight ahead 

d. leave your transmission in neutral 

26. When a traffic signal light turns green, you should: 

a. yield the right-of-way to pedestrians 

b. accelerate as quickly as possible to the next intersection 

c. back up slowly 

d. not move until another driver waves you on 

27. Littering: 

a. is against the law 

b. may cause a traffic accident 

c. can lead to a $1 ,000 fine and up to one year in jail 

d. all of the above 

28. A fully loaded tractor-trailer traveling 55 mph could take up to 
to come to a complete stop: 

a. 50 feet 

b. 125 feet 

c. 400 feet 

d. 750 feet 

29 . The "No-Zone" is: 

a. the term used to describe the blind spots around a truck or bus 

b. a special speed zone 

c. a roadway with restrictions on vehicle stereo volume 

d. the television show that replaced The Twilight Zone 



105 



30. The following is true regarding seat belts and child restraints in 
vehicles: 

a. you should never place an infant or small child in the front seat of 
a vehicle with airbags 

b. an airbag can be dangerous to an infant or small child even in a 
low speed collision 

c. you should always make sure all your passengers are using a seat 
belt or child restraint 

d. all of the above 

31. When you are being "tailgated"; 

a. if there is an open lane to your right, move over to the right 

b. if there is not an open lane to your right, wait until the way is clear 
ahead, and reduce speed slowly to encourage the tailgater to drive 
around you 

c. never slow down quickly 

d. all of the above 

32. Liability insurance: 

a. is required for all motor vehicle owners in Missouri 

b. covers the policyholder's legal liability resulting from injuries to 
other persons or damage to their property 

c. can be dropped as soon as you register your motor vehicle 

d. answers a and b 

33. You must keep proof of your liability insurance: 

a. at your office 

b. in a safety deposit box at the bank 

c. in your vehicle whenever it is being operated 

d. at your neighbor's house 

34. If you are at fault in an accident and do not pay for the damages: 

a. your driver license or plates or both will be suspended for one year. 

b. you will save money 

c. your car will be repossessed 

d. you must buy a new car 

35. You must report all vehicle accidents to the Driver License 
Bureau if: 

a. the accident involved an uninsured motorist and there was 
property damage costing more than $500 

b. your vehicle is less than 5 years old 

c. someone was injured or killed 

d. answers a and c 

36. SATOP is an abbreviation for: 

a. Substance Abuse Traffic Offender Program 

b. Salt And Tar On Pavement 

c. Steer At The Other Point 

d. Stop Airing Tires Over Pressure 



106 



37. If you are ordered to install an ignition interlock on your vehicle, 
the cost of installation and monthly inspection must be paid by: 

a. the court clerk 

b. the police officer 

c. you 

d. the judge 

38. In Missouri, the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level at which 
it is illegal for an adult driver to operate a motor vehicle is: 

a. .08% or more 

b. .05% or more 

c. .020% or more 

d. .008% or more 

39. A point accumulation advisory letter will be sent to you if you: 

a. have too many points taken off of your driver record 

b. accumulate a total of 4 points in 12 months 

c. do not score enough points on your driver test 

d. fail the written test 

40. Points: 

a. are nothing to worry about 

b. are a good thing to have on your driver record 

c. are helpful if you want to get a job driving 

d. are something you don't want on your driver record 

41. FACT is an abbreviation for: 

a. Finance A Car Today 

b. Full Ambulance Cannot Turn 

c. Fear of Authority Causes Tension 

d. Failure to Appear in Court for Traffic violations 

42. Front door windows on a vehicle may be tinted to no more than: 

a. 100% light blockage 

b. whatever looks good 

c. 65% light blockage 

d. 50% light blockage 

43. A license plate frame: 

a. may cover the word Missouri on the plate 

b. should not cover any information on the license plate 

c. may cover the month and year registration stickers 

d. may cover the wording at the bottom of the plate 

44. When a person buys a vehicle, he or she must title the vehicle 
within: 

a. 30 days 

b. 6 months 

c. 1 week 

d. 1 year 

107 



Answer Key: 

1-c, 2-c, 3-b, 4-b, 5-c, 6-a, 7-c, 8-d, 9-d, 10-a, 11-d, 12-d, 13-b, 14-b, 15-a, 
16-a, 17-d, 18-d, 19-c, 20-b, 21 -d, 22-b, 23-a, 24-d, 25-a, 26-a, 27-d, 28-c, 
29-a, 30-d, 31 -d, 32-d, 33-c, 34-a, 35-d, 36-a, 37-c, 38-a, 39-b, 40-d, 41 -d, 
42-c, 43-b, 44-a 



WHEN YOU DRIVE A VEHICLE 
(EVEN IF IT IS NOT YOURS), YOU 
MUST BE PREPARED TO SHOW 
THE INSURANCE AND REGISTRATION 
PAPERS UPON DEMAND BY A LAW 
ENFORCEMENT OFFICER! 



108 



INDEX 



Accidents 

What To Do 90 

Reporting An Accident 90-91 

Alcohol, Drugs, and Driving 76-80 

Bicycles see Sharing the Road 

Blind Awareness Fund 17 

Boater Safety Indicator 18 

Blood Alcohol Content (BAG) 76-80 

Child Restraints 65-66 

Commercial Driver License (Class A, B, or C) 10 

Commercial Vehicles 96-101 

Contact Us 7, 115 

Crosswalks and Stop Lines 29 

Defensive Driving 66-70 

Deny Driver License (Parent/Guardian) 20 

Driver License (Glass F) 9 

Driver License Renewal 10-12, 15-16, 22 

Driver License Renewal/Replacement 

(while out-of-state) 16 

Driver License Restrictions 14 

Driver's Privacy Protection Act (DPPA) 19 

Driving Test 24-27 

Failing The Driving Test 27 

Duplicate Driver License (Lost, Stolen, 

or Destroyed) 16 

Emergencies 56 

Emergency Vehicles 44 

Emissions Inspections 95 

Endorsements 14-15 

Examination 23-27 

When You Must Take The Exam: 24 

Where To Take the Exam 24 

Expiration, License 15 

Fees 1 3 

Failure To Appear in Court For Traffic 

Violations (FACT) 82-83 

Fees for Permits/Licenses 13 

Financial Responsibility 88 



109 



Following Distance 66-68 

For-Hire License (Class E) 9-10 

Full Driver License (Under 21 ) 22 

Funeral Processions 63 

Graduated Driver License Law (GDL) 20-22 

Hand Signals 45 

Higliway Driving 52-56 

Higliway Hypnosis 55-56 

How to Lose Your License 19-20 

Inspection (Vehicle Safety) 92-94 

Instruction Permit 8, 20-21 

Insurance (Types of) 88 

Intermediate License 9, 21-22 

"J88" Notation For Deaf or Hard of 

Hearing Applicants 1 7 

Licenses (Types of) 9-10 

License Checklist 23 

License Plates 

Lost 87 

Personalized 87 

Littering 64 

IVIandatory Insurance 88-91 

IVIedical Referral 14 

IVIissouri Residential Address 11-12 

IVIopeds see Sharing the Road 

IVIotorcycles see Sharing the Road 

IVIotorcycle Instruction Permit 8-9 

IVIotorcycle License (Class M) 10 

Name Changes 12 

Nondriver License/Identification Card (ND) 10 

Notice of Sale 87 

Organ Donation And Attorney In Fact 16-17 

Organ Donor Program Fund 17 

Parking 49-51 

Pavement Markings & Meanings 28-30 

Pedestrians 59-60 

Permanent Disability Indicator 18 

Permits (Types of) 8-9 

Point System 81-83 

Proof of Insurance 79, 88-89 

Required Documentation 11-12 



110 



Required Documentation Exemption for 



Senior Citizens 11 

Requirements to Obtain License/Permit 10-12 

Road Rage 63-64 

Road Sign Test 25 

Roundabout Intersections 48 

Rules of the Road 43-48 

Safe Driving Tips 65-75 

Safety Inspection/Equipment Needed 92-94 

Sample Test Questions 102-107 

School Bus Information 44-45 

Seat Belts 65-66 

Selective Service Registration 19 

Selling a Vehicle 87 

Sharing the Road 57-64 

Special Driving Conditions see Safe Driving Tips 

Stopping Distances 68 

Suspended/Revoked, Driving While 82 

Tabs (Lost, Destroyed, or Stolen) 87 

Tailgating 67, 99 

Traffic Officers 30 

Traffic Signals 30-32 

Traffic Signs 32-42 

Colors 32 

Shapes 33 

Types 33-42 

U-Turns 46 

Vehicle Emergencies 73-75 

Vehicle Registration 85-86 

Vehicle Titling 84-85 

Verification of Identity 11-12 

Verification of Name and Age 24 

Verification of Social Security Number 12 

Veteran Designation 18-19 

Vision Test 24-25 

Failing The Vision Test 25 

Voter Registration 19 

Web Site 7 

Written Test 24 



111 



GLOSSARY 



AIR BAGS — Supplemental restraint systems that are standard equipment 
in many newer vehicles, to protect vehicle occupants during collisions. 
Designed to be used with seat belts. 

ANTI-LOCK BRAKING SYSTEM (ABS) — Allows the driver to stop without 
brake lockup. Standard equipment in many newer vehicles. Designed to 
be used by applying steady pressure on the brake pedal. 

ALL-TERRAIN VEHICLE (ATV) — Any motor vehicle designed to travel 
over any terrain, of a type possessing three to six rubber tires, and 
powered by a gasoline engine not exceeding 600 cubic centimeters and is 
used exclusively for off-highway use. 

BICYCLE — Any vehicle having two tandem wheels, propelled solely 
by human power, upon which any person may ride (except scooters and 
similar devices). 

BLIND SPOT — The areas at the left and right corner of the car that the 
driver can not see in the rearview mirrors. 

BLOOD ALCOHOL CONCENTRATION (BAC) — The percent (%) of 
alcohol in a person's blood. In Missouri it is illegal to operate a motor 
vehicle when the BAC is 0.08% or more for a person who is age 21 or over; 
and 0.020% or more for a person who is under age 21 . 

BYPASS — A road used for going around or passing an area. 

CONTROLLED INTERSECTION — An intersection where traffic is 
regulated by traffic signs or signal lights. 

DAYTIME RUNNING LAMPS — Upper beam headlights that go on 
automatically when the vehicle is running. This is a feature of many newer 
vehicles. 

DECELERATION LANE — An extra driving lane on the side of a high- 
speed highway to permit vehicles to slow down before exiting. 

DEFENSIVE DRIVING — Being careful to prevent accidents, in spite of 
incorrect actions of others or bad driving conditions. 

DRIVER IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM — A required course of study for 
certain drivers who have shown cause that their driving skills are not 
acceptable. The course must meet or exceed the standards of the National 
Safety Council's eight-hour "Defensive Driving Course". 

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE (DUI) — Driving when your senses 
and judgment are impaired by alcohol or other drugs. 

ENDORSEMENT — A code used on a driver license or permit, to show 
that you are also qualified to operate other types of vehicles (such as a 
motorcycle). Two examples of commercial driver license endorsements are 
P (passenger vehicle) and H (hazardous materials). 



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FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY — A driver's (or car owner's) ability to pay 
for damage caused by an accident wlien lie or she is at fault. It is usually 
in the form of liability insurance. 

FREEWAY — A high-speed divided highway without intersections. 

GRADUATED DRIVER LICENSE — A step-by-step licensing process for 
all new driver license applicants under the age of 21 . 

HIGHWAY — Any publicly-maintained roadway that is open to the use of 
the public for purposes of vehicular travel. 

HYDROPLANING — A driving condition where the tires lose traction on a 
wet road, and float on a layer of water or slush. 

IMPAIRMENT — Physical and/or mental condition that can reduce the 
ability to operate a motor vehicle safely. 

IMPLIED CONSENT — Under this law, a driver (by driving), automatically 
agrees to take a test to measure blood alcohol concentration when stopped 
(under 21 years old), under arrest (age 21 and over), and suspected of 
driving under the influence. 

INTERCHANGE — The junction of two or more highways where turnoffs 
allow you to join or cross traffic. 

INTERSTATE SYSTEM — A national network of over 41 ,000 miles of 
limited access highways set by Congress. 

INTOXICATION — The state of a person who has consumed too much 
alcohol. 

MANDATORY SENTENCES — These are penalties set by law for certain 
driving offenses and, if convicted, the penalties must be carried out. 

MEDIAN — A strip of land separating traffic going in opposite directions. 

MERGING TRAFFIC — Traffic from two separate lanes combining into one. 

NO ZONE — Blind spots or danger areas, particularly around large trucks, 
where crashes may occur. 

PEDESTRIAN — Any person on foot. 

PRIVILEGE — A benefit. A driver license is a privilege, and not a basic 
right granted by law. 

REACTION DISTANCE — The distance a car travels before the driver can 
take corrective action to a perceived danger. 

REINSTATEMENT — The return of driving privilege after it has been 
suspended/revoked/denied, after all reinstatement requirements are met by 
the driver. 



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RESTRICTION — A special need that must be met in order to drive legally. 
Restrictions are marked on the driver license. For example, if you must 
wear corrective lenses to pass the vision test, then you must also wear 
them while driving. Your license will have an "A" restriction (for corrective 
lenses). 

RIGHT OF WAY — The privilege of the immediate use of the highway. 
Pedestrians always have the right of way. At uncontrolled intersections, 
the vehicle to the left shall yield the right of way to the vehicle approaching 
from the right. 

SATOP — Substance Abuse Traffic Offender Program. 

SHOULDER — The portion of the highway for emergency use, but not 
intended for travel. 

TAILGATING — Following another vehicle too closely. 

UTILITY VEHICLE — Any motor vehicle designed primarily for 
landscaping, lawn care, or maintenance which is sixty-three inches or less 
in width, traveling on four or six wheels and is used exclusively for off- 
highway use. 

VIOLATION — A failure to obey driving rules and regulations. 



IF YOU AREN'T SURE YOU 
UNDERSTAND A TRAFFIC LAW, 
ASK A LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER! 



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CONTACT INFORMATION 



DRIVER LICENSE QUESTIONS Phone Number 

General Information 573-751-1887 

Information 24 / 7 573-526-2407 

MOTOR VEHICLE QUESTIONS 

General Information 573-526-3669 

STATE HIGHWAY PATROL 

Troop A, Lee's Summit 816-622-0800 

Troop B, Macon 660-385-2132 

Troop C, Kirkwood 314-340-4000 

Troop D, Springfield 417-895-6868 

Troop E, Poplar Bluff 573-840-9500 

Troop F, Jefferson City 573-751-1000 

Troop G, Willow Springs 417-469-3121 

Troop H, St. Joseph 816-387-2345 

Troop I, Rolla 573-368-2345 

HIGHWAY PATROL STATEWIDE TOLL FREE ElVIERGENCY 

ASSISTANCE NUMBER 1-800-525-5555 

or cellular *55 



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Since 1931, 30 Missouri State Higliway Patrol Troopers liave been killed 
In the line of duty. Eight of those officers were killed after being struck by 
a vehicle, whose driver was either Impaired or not paying attention. The 
number one contributing circumstance to traffic crashes in Missouri is 
driver Inattention. Please slow down and move over away from stationary 
emergency vehicles along the side of the road with their emergency 
equipment activated. IT'S THE LAW. 

The law (Section 304.022, RSMo.) requires motorists to yield the right-of-way 

and Immediately drive to a position parallel to, 
and as far as possible to the right of, the traveled 
portion of the highway and thereupon stop and 
remain In such position until such emergency 
vehicle has passed, except when otherwise 
directed by a police or traffic officer. 

A revision to the law, which became effective 
August 28, 2012, requires motorists upon 
approaching a stationary emergency vehicle 
displaying lighted red or red and blue lights, or vehicles owned by the 
Commission and operated by Department of Transportation employees 
displaying amber or amber and white lights: 

(1) Proceed with caution and yield the right-of-way. If possible, with due 
regard to safety and traffic conditions, by making a lane change Into a 
lane not adjacent to that of the stationary vehicle, if on a roadway having 
at least four lanes with not less than two lanes proceeding In the same 
direction as the approaching vehicle; or 

(2) Proceed with due caution and reduce the speed of the vehicle, 
maintaining a safe speed for road conditions, if changing lanes would be 
unsafe or Impossible. 

Violation of this section Is a class A misdemeanor. 




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